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  1. PNG

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Wilt L. Idema
    and Stephen H. West

    Battles, Betrayals, and Brotherhood

     "Battles, Betrayals, and Brotherhood is a brilliant introduction to one of China’s best-loved heroic traditions. And of course the translations are wonderful—very lively!"
         —Katherine Carlitz, University of Pittsburgh

  2. Complete Poems and Fragments

    Sappho
    Translated by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction by Pamela Gordon

    Complete Poems and Fragments

    "In this expanded edition of his distinguished Sappho: Poems and Fragments (2002), Stanley Lombardo offers over 100 fragments not included in the original edition, as well as the new poems discovered in 2004 and 2014. His translation of this latter material yields fresh insights into Sappho’s representations of old age, two of her brothers, and her special relationship with Aphrodite. Pamela Gordon’s engaging, balanced, and informative Introduction has been revised to incorporate discussion of the new fragments, which subtly alter our previous understanding of the archaic poet’s corpus. Complete Poems and Fragments also offers a useful updated bibliography, as well as a section on ‘Elegiac Sappho’ that presents the reception of the Lesbian poet in later Greek and Latin elegiac poems. A wonderful find for any Greekless reader searching for a complete and up-to-date Sappho."
         —Patricia A. Rosenmeyer, Department of Classics, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  3. Cymbeline

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Hannah C. Wojciehowski
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Cymbeline

    "The New Kittredge series is both a delight and a steal. Kittredge's textual authority, updated by eminent scholars sensitive to classroom needs and alert to staging choices, is once again available in these slim, elegant, inexpensive, user-friendly volumes. With lucid notes and incisive introductions geared especially to popular film versions, the series also offers an overview of both stage and film performances of each play. A must for any Shakespeare class."
         —Laury Magnus, Contributing Editor, New Kittredge Shakespeare and Hamletworks.org

  4. Edward II

    Christopher Marlowe
    Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by Stephen J. Lynch

    Edward II

    "This exciting new edition of Edward II is indeed reader friendly. Of particular distinction are the introductory sections which include a thorough account of Marlowe's biography, a fresh critical examination of the play, plus a bibliography for further reading; a wise consideration of the date and text; and extensive annotations, especially helpful to students who have difficulties with the language. Of special value to both students and scholars are the Related Texts that follow the text of the play: three sections of documentary evidence on historical sources; power and politics; and love, friendship, and homoeroticism—all vital to an understanding of the play. No previous edition of the play manages to encompass so much."
         —Robert A. Logan, University of Hartford

  5. Exemplary Novellas

    Cervantes
    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Michael Harney

    Exemplary Novellas

    "Michael Harney's translation of Cervantes's Novelas ejemplares is the most authoritative and accurate rendering of Cervantes's classic tales to date and promises to be the translation against which future translations will be measured. Harney skillfully portrays the nuanced and complex world of the Exemplary Novellas in a translation that is faithful to the letter and spirit of the original. An erudite and informative Introduction presents a general overview of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Spain, the life of Cervantes, and a detailed analysis of the Exemplary Novellas. Before each story, Harney provides a brief synopsis, an analysis of the novella’s themes, motifs, and generic affinities, and a bibliography for further reading. In addition, numerous footnotes complement the background information Harney provides in the Introduction and prior to each novella."
         —Michael J. McGrath, Georgia Southern University

  6. Faust: The First Part of the Tragedy

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
    Translated, with an introduction and notes, by Margaret Kirby

    Faust: The First Part of the Tragedy

    "Kirby reproduces in simple, clear English—and almost always line for line—the meaning of Goethe's German text, with metrical variations that evoke the shifting meters of the original."
          —Jane Brown, University of Washington

  7. Haft Paykar

    Nizami
    Translated with an Introduction and Notes by Julie Scott Meisami

    Haft Paykar

    "The Haft Paykar—Nizami's twelfth-century masterpiece, written in the Persian verse couplet form known as masnavi—has waited a long time for a translation like this: one that simultaneously captures its lightness and charm and plumbs its wealth of cultural detail. Julie Meisami's deft, accurate, seemingly effortless version (rendered in English tetrameter, an inspired choice) is a rare accomplishment."
         —Michael Beard, University of North Dakota

  8. King Henry the Sixth: Parts I, II, and III

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Annalisa Castaldo
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    King Henry the Sixth: Parts I, II, and III

    George Lyman Kittredge's insightful editions of Shakespeare have endured in part because of his eclecticism, his diversity of interests, and his wide-ranging accomplishments—all of which are reflected in the valuable notes in each volume. The plays in the New Kittredge Shakespeare series retain the original Kittredge notes and introductions, changed or augmented only when some modernization seems necessary. These new editions also include introductory essays by contemporary editors, notes on the plays as they have been performed on stage and film, and additional student materials.

  9. King John & Henry VIII

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by James H. Lake, Courtney Lehmann, and Jane Wells
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    King John & Henry VIII

    "This is a terrific edition that really brings King John and Henry VIII to life. Consistently inviting student participation, the edition makes the plays wonderfully accessible, through explanations of the language, descriptions of context, topic guides, plot outlines, illustrations, and genealogies. A particular strength is the emphasis on performance. Thanks to the insightful histories provided, King John and Henry VIII are richly illuminated as stage and screen creations, allowing for genuinely imaginative engagement with these most fascinating Shakespearean dramas."
         —Ramona Wray, Reader in English at Queen's University, Belfast

  10. Lazarillo de Tormes and The Grifter (El Buscon)

    Edited and Translated by David Frye

    Lazarillo de Tormes and The Grifter (El Buscon)

    "An elegant, precise, and accessible modern-English rendering of the two best examples of the early modern picaresque genre: the paradigmatic Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's mordant El Buscón. Frye's translations are triumphant, capturing the cadence of popular early modern speech while remaining faithful to the original texts; his notes illuminate the diverse contexts in which the texts were written. Frye gives careful attention throughout to the historical background that propelled these two parallel but different monuments of Golden Age Spanish literature."
         —Teofilo Ruiz, UCLA

  11. Le Morte D'Arthur

    Sir Thomas Malory
    Condensed and modernized, with an Introduction, by Joseph Glaser

    Le Morte D'Arthur

    "I've just finished reading Joseph Glaser's Le Morte D'Arthur. I'm very pleased with it: the introduction is helpful without becoming an extended essay, the suggested reading seems solid and diverse, and the index is VERY useful, even for someone who has read Malory before. At last, a reader can keep all the knights and ladies straight! A fine entry point to a grand text, and when I next have an occasion to teach a course involving chivalry, I'll plan to use this very affordable edition."  
          —Craig Caldwell, Department of History, Appalachian State University

  12. PNG (200 x 260)

    Edited by David Bevington

    Medieval Drama

    This reprint (with updated 'Suggestions for Further Reading') of the Houghton Mifflin edition makes David Bevington's classic anthology of medieval drama available again at an affordable price.

  13. Montaigne: Selected Essays

    Michel de Montaigne
    Translated by James B. Atkinson and David Sices
    Introduction and Notes by James B. Atkinson

    Montaigne: Selected Essays

    "A superb achievement, one that successfully brings together in accessible form the work of two major writers of Renaissance France. This is now the default version of Montaigne in English."
         —Timothy Hampton, Professor of French and Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley

  14. Paradiso

    Dante
    Translated by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction, Notes, and Headnotes, by Alison Cornish

    Paradiso

    Forthcoming - available for pre-order, pre-orders will ship when the book is released in March 2017.

    "This translation and commentary are an essential contribution to Dante's reception in English. Stanley Lombardo's translation is accurate, elegant, and transparent, a mirror of the original text. Alison Cornish's commentary is lucid, graceful, and precise, with just the right level of detail; it penetrates and opens the Paradiso's philosophical, scientific, and theological dimensions with authority, balance, sensitivity, and simplicity. Perhaps now more readers will follow Dante to Paradise." —Christian Moevs, Associate Professor of Italian, University of Notre Dame

  15. Persian Letters (MacKenzie Edition)

    Montesquieu
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Raymond N. MacKenzie

    Persian Letters (MacKenzie Edition)

    "An excellent edition that will give students a clean, well-translated text without too much clutter. The introduction is magisterial."
        —Srinivas Aravamudan, Duke University

  16. Philoctetes

    Sophocles
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Peter Meineck and Paul Woodruff

    Philoctetes

    "Peter Meineck has given us a superbly vivid rendering of the play, informed throughout by his practical experience in the theater. His is a Philoctetes that is supremely alive, from start to finish. . . . [I]deal for classroom use. . . . accompanied by a new and thoughtful introduction from philosopher and classicist Paul Woodruff. Woodruff anchors the play in the complex web of fears and anxieties of 409 BCE, as both Sophocles' life and Athens' imperial heyday drew to a close. . . . [A]n exceptionally fine work of translation and scholarship that will go far toward demolishing dismissals of the play as inaccessible or unengaging for the modern reader. Sophocles, Meineck and Woodruff eloquently remind us, speaks to every age, not least our own."
         —Thomas R. Keith, Loyola University Chicago in CJ-Online

  17. Purgatorio (Lombardo Edition)

    Dante
    Translated by Stanley Lombardo; Introduction by Claire E. Honess and Matthew Treherne; Notes and Headnotes by Ruth Chester

    Purgatorio (Lombardo Edition)

    "Fresh, lively, and reliable, Stanley Lombardo's Purgatorio easily earns its place in the great tradition of English-language renderings of Dante. Excellent introductory material and footnotes help to make this a version that will appeal to scholars, students, and general readers alike."
          —Steven Botterill, Associate Professor of Italian Studies, University of California, Berkeley

  18. Renaissance Humanism

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Margaret L. King

    Renaissance Humanism

    "By far the best collection of sources to introduce readers to Renaissance humanism in all its many guises. What distinguishes this stimulating and useful anthology is the vision behind it: King shows that Renaissance thinkers had a lot to say, not only about the ancient world—one of their habitual passions—but also about the self, how civic experience was configured, the arts, the roles and contributions of women, the new science, the 'new' world, and so much more."
         —Christopher S. Celenza, Johns Hopkins University

  19. PNG

    Horace
    Translated by John Svarlien
    Introduction and Notes by David Mankin

    Satires

    "This work will be a welcome addition to course reading lists, as it does justice to Horace's misleadingly simple verse. Svarlien’s rhythmic lines go down lightly and easily—as he renders Horace's phrase, he 'writes like people talk,' yet it is a talk that jars and provokes. Mankin's concise and highly readable notes will be as useful to scholars as to new readers of Horace: they are packed with cultural background, stylistic commentary, useful cross-references, and appealing suggestions on interpretation."
         —Catherine Keane, Department of Classics, Washington University in St. Louis

  20. Sunjata: A New Prose Version

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by David C. Conrad

    Sunjata: A New Prose Version

    "After existing orally for hundreds of years, Sunjata was written down in the twentieth century. David Conrad, who recorded a new version of the epic, has now crafted a prose translation that preserves the oral flavor of live performance. The result is a captivating work of literature that will finally give the story of Sunjata its well-deserved place among the great epics of world literature."
         —Martin Puchner, Byron and Anita Wien Professor of Drama and of English and Comparative Literature, Harvard University

  21. The Golden Age of Folk and Fairy Tales

    Edited, with Introduction and Translations, by Jack Zipes

    The Golden Age of Folk and Fairy Tales

    "Jack Zipes is back with a massive, beautifully produced volume. It is basically an anthology of mostly translated texts, but with a thirty-seven-page presentation and illuminating introductions to each of the eighteen thematic sections. At the end, we get fifteen pages of short biographies of the collectors of the tales and a twenty-eight-page bibliography of collections, reference works, and criticism. . . . A master in his field has to be congratulated on yet another achievement."
         —Hans Kuhn, Australian National University, in Journal of Folklore Research

  22. The Merry Wives of Windsor

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Jane W. Wells
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    The Merry Wives of Windsor

    George Lyman Kittredge's insightful editions of Shakespeare have endured in part because of his eclecticism, his diversity of interests, and his wide-ranging accomplishments—all of which are reflected in the valuable notes in each volume. The plays in the New Kittredge Shakespeare series retain the original Kittredge notes and introductions, changed or augmented only when some modernization seems necessary. These new editions also include introductory essays by contemporary editors, notes on the plays as they have been performed on stage and film, and additional student materials.

  23. Orestes_Plays_PNG

    Euripides
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Cecelia Eaton Luschnig

    The Orestes Plays

    Featuring Cecelia Eaton Luschnig's annotated verse translations of Euripides' Electra, Iphigenia among the Tauri, and Orestes, this volume offers an ideal avenue for exploring the playwright's innovative treatment of both traditional and non-traditional stories concerning a central, fascinating member of the famous House of Atreus.

  24. The Poetic Edda

    Translated and Edited, with Introduction, by Jackson Crawford

    The Poetic Edda

    "The poems of the Poetic Edda have waited a long time for a Modern English translation that would do them justice. Here it is at last (Odin be praised!) and well worth the wait. These amazing texts from a 13th-century Icelandic manuscript are of huge historical, mythological and literary importance, containing the lion's share of information that survives today about the gods and heroes of pre-Christian Scandinavians, their unique vision of the beginning and end of the world, etc. Jackson Crawford's modern versions of these poems are authoritative and fluent and often very gripping.  With their individual headnotes and complementary general introduction, they supply today's readers with most of what they need to know in order to understand and appreciate the beliefs, motivations, and values of the Vikings."   
          —Dick Ringler, Professor Emeritus of English and Scandinavian Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison

  25. Tristan_Iseut_PNG

    Joseph B├ędier
    Translated, with an Introduction, by Edward J. Gallagher

    The Romance of Tristan and Iseut

    "This edition stands out because it is not a reworking of Belloc's version but a translation of Bédier's actual text. Gone are archaic spellings ("The Little Fakry Bell" becomes "The Enchanted Bell") and abstruse terms (the "Tintagel Minster" now reads as "the church at Tintagel"). Gallagher provides a brief, informative introduction, useful glossaries of proper names and specialized terms, and five well-selected texts about the Tristan legend, including a haunting scene Bédier composed but chose not to use. Beautifully written, this modern English translation proves once again that the love of Tristan and Iseut endures beyond all limits of time and space. Summing up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and above."
        —C. B. Kerr, Vassar College, in CHOICE

  26. The Song of Roland

    Translated by John DuVal
    Introduced by David Staines

    The Song of Roland

    "The true poetry of the most well-known French epic springs vividly to life here in an entirely new way. DuVal's unique translation captures the meter and assonance of the original at the same time that it conveys the breathless pace, as simple as it is complex, of one of the most moving tales of all time. One can hear—and feel—the singer of tales speaking to us today. I cannot wait to teach this text in the classroom."
         —Jody Enders, University of California, Santa Barbara

  27. Three Comedies

    Aristophanes and Menander
    Translated by Douglass Parker
    Edited, with Introductions and Notes, by Timothy J. Moore

    Three Comedies

    "No one, but no one, ever translated ancient comedy like Douglass Parker, and his death left a chasm in the landscape. This posthumous publication of three of Greek theatre's wildest plays, edited and presented by a scholar as eminent and learned as Timothy Moore, is not just something to welcome, it is something to celebrate."
         —William Levitan, Grand Valley State University

  28. Three Sisters

    Anton Chekhov
    Translated, with an Introduction and Notes, by Sharon Marie Carnicke

    Three Sisters

    "This compact book combines a lively, colloquial transition of Chekhov's late play Three Sisters with an informative and insightful introduction. Actor-focuses but broad in coverage, this edition should be required reading for any ensemble producing the play in English. It is also highly recommended for a general reader and for classroom use. Although this is not a scholarly work, it has a lot to offer scholars and Chekhov veterans."
         —Carol Apollonio, Duke University, in The Russian Review

  29. Troilus and Cressida

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Toby Widdicombe
    General Editor: James H. Lake

    Troilus and Cressida

    "The New Kittredge series is both a delight and a steal. Kittredge’s textual authority, updated by eminent scholars sensitive to classroom needs and alert to staging choices, is once again available in these slim, elegant, inexpensive, user-friendly volumes. With lucid notes and incisive introductions geared especially to popular film versions, the series also offers an overview of both stage and film performances of each play. A must for any Shakespeare class." —Laury Magnus, U.S. Merchant Marine Academy

  30. Troilus and Criseyde in Modern Verse

    Geoffrey Chaucer
    Translated, with notes, by Joseph Glaser
    Introduction by Christine Chism

    Troilus and Criseyde in Modern Verse

    This fast-moving Modern English version of Chaucer's greatest tragic romance highlights the poem's rapid shifts in register and diction as well as its subtle and elusive characterizations, while preserving the enchanting rhyme-royal stanza of the Middle English original. Christine Chism's Introduction illuminates the work's historical context, poetic devices, first audiences, sources, and non-traditional re-conception of a traditional female protagonist "whose faults," as Criseyde says, "are rolled on every tongue."

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