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Theatre & Film

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  1. A Midsummer Night's Dream

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by John Ford
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    A Midsummer Night's Dream

    "This edition of A Midsummer Night's Dream is wonderfully lucid and thoughtful, offering supporting material that will appeal to readers from high school students to scholars. The introduction is especially thoughtful, offering, in addition to expected discussions of love, magic and imagination, an exploration of the theatrical history. The bibliography and filmography are both detailed and helpful, and the questions guide students to consider the play from many viewpoints without ever forcing an interpretation onto them."
         —Annalisa Castaldo, Widener University

  2. A More Perfect Ten

    Gary Garrison

    A More Perfect Ten

    A More Perfect Ten is a revision of Gary Garrison's pioneering book on writing and producing the 10-minute play, and it is now the most authoritative book on this emerging play form. The 10-minute play has become a regular feature of theatre companies and festivals from coast to coast, and Garrison has distilled the advice of many of those people who had been instrumental in promoting the ten minute play for the last few years.

  3. Acharnians, Lysistrata, Clouds

    Aristophanes
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Jeffrey Henderson

    Acharnians, Lysistrata, Clouds

    Three of Aristophanes' greatest comedies available in one volume by one of the most important scholars and translators of Greek comedy. Each of these plays is also sold separately, available from Focus in a single play edition.

  4. Acting and Living in Discovery

    Carol Rosenfeld

    Acting and Living in Discovery

    "Carol Rosenfeld has a singular gift for discerning and nurturing in her students the live connections that release emotionally charged experience into active and meaningful play. Her book is a bottomless resource for the actor who aspires to that seamless merging of self and character that can make the theatre thrilling. It is hard and vulnerable work that she demands, but she is there with you as a guide, saying 'search here, observe there, sense this, question, question, question, and allow'—If you trust her, you will surprise yourself."
         —Edith Meeks, Executive and Artistic Director, HB Studio

  5. Alcestis, Medea, Hippolytus

    Euripides
    Translated by Diane Arnson Svarlien
    Introduction and Notes by Robin Mitchell-Boyask

    Alcestis, Medea, Hippolytus

    This new volume of three of Euripides' most celebrated plays offers graceful, economical, metrical translations that convey the wide range of effects of the playwright's verse, from the idiomatic speech of its dialogue to the high formality of its choral odes.

  6. All's Well That Ends Well

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Kathleen Kalpin Smith
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    All's Well That Ends Well

    "Adding entirely new annotations to the text, providing a lucid overview of the play's production history, concluding with an instructive essay on a theatrical understanding of reading plays, and illustrated with suggestive film stills throughout, Kathleen Kalpin Smith's All's Well that Ends Well is a welcome edition to the New Kittredge Shakespeare series, richly setting the play in the context of stage and screen performance."
         —W. B. Worthen, Barnard College, Columbia University

  7. An Actor's Task

    Baron Kelly

    An Actor's Task

    An Actor's Task provides a framework for studying the dual arts of acting: inhabiting a character both physically and psychologically. Actors at all levels can use this book to explore, develop, and review the sensory tools and training that enable them to be the best versions of themselves and, ultimately, to bring that understanding of "self" to their art. 

    "Through a series of engaging exercises, this book filters out the complexities of various acting techniques and offers up an appealing hands-on approach."
         —Tonya Pinkins, Tony Award–winning actress

  8. Andromache, Hecuba, Trojan Women

    Euripides
    Translated by Diane Arnson Svarlien
    Introduction and Notes by Ruth Scodel

    Andromache, Hecuba, Trojan Women

    Diane Arnson Svarlien’s translation of Euripides’ Andromache, Hecuba, and Trojan Women exhibits the same scholarly and poetic standards that have won praise for her Alcestis, Medea, Hippolytus. Ruth Scodel’s Introduction examines the cultural and political context in which Euripides wrote, and provides analysis of the themes, structure, and characters of the plays included. Her notes offer expert guidance to readers encountering these works for the first time.

  9. Antigone (Blondell Edition)

    Sophocles
    Translated, with Introduction and Essay, by Ruby Blondell

    Antigone (Blondell Edition)

    "In her new translation of Antigone, Ruby Blondell demonstrates an unswerving sense of what the general reader needs to know in order not only to understand Sophocles, but to relish him as well… My own students have found that this edition not only makes the Antigone accessible, but also helps them understand why it continues to fascinate, to disturb, and to grip its readers century by century."
          —John T. Kirby, Comparative Literature, Purdue University

  10. Antigone (Woodruff Edition)

    Sophocles
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Paul Woodruff

    Antigone (Woodruff Edition)

    “A lucid, well-paced translation, natural enough sounding in the dialogue to make a good acting version, and remarkably successful in making the choruses clear, lyrical, and yet part of the dramatic movement. Woodruff’s rendering of the choruses especially impresses me by the way he manages to render complex syntax and imagery of the original—often tangled and occasionally obscure in its allusiveness—into clear and genuinely poetic English.”
         —Joseph Russo, Haverford College

  11. Antony and Cleopatra

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Sarah Hatchuel
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Antony and Cleopatra

    "The New Kittredge Series is both a delight and a steal. Kittredge's textual authority, updated by eminent scholars sensitive to classroom needs and alert to staging choices, is once again available in these slim, elegant, inexpensive, user-friendly volumes. With lucid notes and incisive introductions geared especially to popular film versions, the series also offers an overview of both stage and film performances of each play. A must for any Shakespeare class."
         —Laury Magnus

  12. PNG

    Aristophanes
    Translated, with Notes, by Peter Meineck
    Introduction by Ian C. Storey

    Aristophanes 1: Clouds, Wasps, Birds

    Originally adapted for the stage, Peter Meineck’s revised translations achieve a level of fidelity appropriate for classroom use while managing to preserve the wit and energy that led The New Yorker to judge his Clouds “The best Greek drama we’ve ever seen anywhere,” and The Times Literary Supplement to describe his Wasps as “Hugely enjoyable and very, very funny.” A general Introduction, introductions to the plays, and detailed notes on staging, history, religious practice and myth combine to make this a remarkably useful teaching text.

  13. Art of Active Dramaturgy

    Lenora Inez Brown

    Art of Active Dramaturgy

    "This is the first real text, the first real primer for how to be a dramaturg in a variety of settings—from production to new plays. It takes a student from a close reading (really directing that reading) to formulating questions, to meeting with directors, playwrights, designers, to formulating acting packets and finally to opening night. I don't think any other book on the market does such a complete job with such research and in such a great format."
          —Mark Charney, Clemson University

  14. Artist's Guide to the Law

    Richard Amada

    Artist's Guide to the Law

    "Author Rich Amada has done a remarkable job in de-mystifying the legal system and basic law for creative types. Amada has written this work in a very clear and even humorous manner, making it a surprisingly easy, quick read. Anyone can readily understand the basics to how to protect one’s work and potentially maximize profits from creative labor after reading Amada’s book."
         —Andy Rodriguez, New Phoenix Filmworks

  15. As You Like It

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Patricia Lennox
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    As You Like It

    "Now, in the twenty-first century, Patricia Lennox broadens that understanding in her excellent edition of As You Like It where she draws on her knowledge of international film and television. She offers new meaning for modern readers who, while they savor Shakespeare’s language also understand visual signals from contemporary media."
         —Irene G. Dash, Hunter College, CUNY, retired

  16. Bacchae (Esposito Edition)

    Euripides
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Stephen Esposito

    Bacchae (Esposito Edition)

    English translation, with introductory material, notes, glossary and essay by Stephen Esposito, of Euripides' tragedy based on the mythological story of King Pentheus of Thebes.

  17. Bacchae (Woodruff Edition)

    Euripides
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Paul Woodruff

    Bacchae (Woodruff Edition)

    "[Woodruff’s translation] is clear, fluent, and vigorous, well thought out, readable and forceful. The rhythms are right, ever-present but not too insistent or obvious. It can be spoken instead of read and so is viable as an acting version; and it keeps the lines of the plot well focused. The Introduction offers a good survey of critical approaches. The notes at the foot of the page are suitably brief and nonintrusive and give basic information for the non-specialist."
         —Charles Segal, Harvard University

  18. PNG

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Wilt L. Idema
    and Stephen H. West

    Battles, Betrayals, and Brotherhood

     "Battles, Betrayals, and Brotherhood is a brilliant introduction to one of China’s best-loved heroic traditions. And of course the translations are wonderful—very lively!"
         —Katherine Carlitz, University of Pittsburgh

  19. Clouds (Henderson Edition)

    Aristophanes
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Jeffrey Henderson

    Clouds (Henderson Edition)

    Jeffrey Henderson, noted Greek scholar, has translated into English one of Aristophanes' greatest comedies. Offered with detailed notes and an enlightening introduction, this modern translation brings to life the wit and elegance of the language while putting the text in historical and cultural context.

  20. Clouds (Meineck Edition)

    Aristophanes
    Translated, with Notes, by Peter Meineck
    Introduction by Ian C. Storey

    Clouds (Meineck Edition)

    "Since the appearance of Sommerstein’s very successful literal translation less than twenty years ago, there have been at least five further new published attempts at rendering the play into English. It is certainly a bold enterprise to introduce yet one more translation onto the scene, but Peter Meineck has risen well to the challenge. The translation is straightforward and idiomatic, as well as well-paced and funny. . . Ian Storey’s Introduction is perfect for undergraduates.”
         —Max Nelson, Bryn Mawr Classical Review

  21. Coriolanus

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Jeffrey Kahan
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Coriolanus

    "Professor Jeffrey Kahan's expertise in the history of Shakespearean acting complements Kittredge's lucid [introduction and text] to create an edition of Coriolanus that centers modern readers in the play’s performance. Kahan's introduction to the edition both recounts historical performances and carefully details recent directorial choices—choices that reappear in the course of his footnotes providing acting choices for key scenes. These notes, together with photographs of compelling performances, fix the reader's imagination firmly in the midst of Shakespeare’s chilling theatrical portrayal of Republican Rome. This highly accessible edition will prove invaluable for actors, students, and lovers of Shakespeare."
         —Cyndia Clegg, Pepperdine University

  22. Cymbeline

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Hannah C. Wojciehowski
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Cymbeline

    "The New Kittredge series is both a delight and a steal. Kittredge's textual authority, updated by eminent scholars sensitive to classroom needs and alert to staging choices, is once again available in these slim, elegant, inexpensive, user-friendly volumes. With lucid notes and incisive introductions geared especially to popular film versions, the series also offers an overview of both stage and film performances of each play. A must for any Shakespeare class."
         —Laury Magnus, Contributing Editor, New Kittredge Shakespeare and Hamletworks.org

  23. Doctor Faustus (Lake & Ribner Edition)

    Christopher Marlowe
    Edited by James H. Lake and Irving Ribner

    Doctor Faustus (Lake & Ribner Edition)

    An annotated version of Doctor Faustus, with modernized spelling and punctuation, of the 1616 B-text. James H. Lake's Introduction discusses the play’s historical and dramatic contexts, but focuses on its performance history from the Elizabethan era to our own, including film productions. Textual notes discuss variations between the A and B texts. Interviews with Ralph Alan Cohen of Shenandoah Shakespeare and Andreas Teuber (Mephistopheles in the Richard Burton production) as well as illustrations from theatre and film performances included.

  24. Electra

    Sophocles
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Hanna M. Roisman

    Electra

    This is an English translation of Sophocles' tragedy of Electra, and the vengeance that she and her brother Orestes take on their mother and step father for the murder of their father. This edition also includes an "afterlife" essay that discusses adaptations of the play, as well as touches on other ways Electra has had influence (Jung's identification of the Electra Complex, O'Neill's Mourning Becomes Electra). Focus Classical Library provides close translations with notes and essays to provide access to understanding Greek culture.

  25. Electra, Phoenician Women, Bacchae, & Iphigenia at Aulis

    Euripides
    Translated, with Notes, by Cecelia Eaton Luschnig and Paul Woodruff, Introduction by Cecelia Eaton Luschnig

    Electra, Phoenician Women, Bacchae, & Iphigenia at Aulis

    The four late plays of Euripides collected here, in beautifully crafted translations by Cecelia Eaton Luschnig and Paul Woodruff, offer a faithful and dynamic representation of the playwright’s mature vision.

  26. Experiencing Theatre

    Anne Fletcher and Scott R. Irelan

    Experiencing Theatre

    "Experiencing Theatre completely engages the beginning theatre student in the art of theatre. Students become playwrights, dramaturges, actors, directors, designers, adapters and collaborators through dynamic readings and excercises. This text gives them a great awareness of the work of being a theatre artist. Teachers have long strived towards creating these opportunities for their Intro students—finally a text that will make it happen."
          —Barbara Burgess-Lefebvre, Robert Morris University

  27. Faust: The First Part of the Tragedy

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
    Translated, with an introduction and notes, by Margaret Kirby

    Faust: The First Part of the Tragedy

    "Kirby reproduces in simple, clear English—and almost always line for line—the meaning of Goethe's German text, with metrical variations that evoke the shifting meters of the original."
          —Jane Brown, University of Washington

  28. Five Comedies

    Plautus and Terence
    Translated by Deena Berg and Douglass Parker

    Five Comedies

    "This is a book worthy of high praise. . . . All versions are exceedingly witty and versatile, in verse that ripples from one’s lips, pulling all the punches of Plautus, the knockabout king of farce, and proving that the more polished Terence can be just as funny. Accuracy to the original has been thoroughly respected, but look at the humour in rendering Diphilius’ play called Synapothnescontes as Three’s a Shroud. . . . Students in schools and colleges will benefit from short introductions to each play, to Roman stage conventions, to different types of Greek and Roman comedy, and there is a note on staging, with a diagram illustrating a typical Roman stage and further diagrams of the basic set for each play. The translators have paid more attention to stage directions than is usually given in translations, because they aim to show how these plays worked. This is a book to be used and enjoyed.”
         —Raymond J. Clark, The Classical Outlook

  29. Four Plays and Three Jokes

    Anton Chekhov
    Translated, with an Introduction and Notes, by Sharon Marie Carnicke

    Four Plays and Three Jokes

    This volume offers lively and accurate translations of Chekhov's major plays and one-acts (complete contents listed below) along with a superb Introduction focused on the plays' remarkably enduring power to elicit the most widely divergent of responses, the life of the playwright in its historical and aesthetic contexts, suggestions for reading the plays "under a microscope," and notes designed to bring Chekhov's world into immediate focus—everything needed to examine his drama with fresh eyes and on its own artistic terms. Three Jokes: The Bear, The Proposal, The Anniversary. The Major Plays: The Seagull, Uncle Vanya, Three Sisters, The Cherry Orchard.

  30. Four Tragedies

    Sophocles
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Peter Meineck and Paul Woodruff

    Four Tragedies

    Meineck and Woodruff's new annotated translations of Sophocles' Ajax, Women of Trachis, Electra, and Philoctetes combine the same standards of accuracy, concision, clarity, and powerful speech that have so often made their Theban Plays a source of epiphany in the classroom and of understanding in the theatre.  Woodruff's Introduction offers a brisk and stimulating discussion of central themes in Sophoclean drama, the life of the playwright, staging issues, and each of the four featured plays.

  31. Fragile Magic

    Ronald A. Willis

    Fragile Magic

    This is a brief, but handy book outlining the task of viewing theatrical performances and evaluating them. Although aimed primarily at the festival level respondent, it is a book that can enhance the ability to evaluate and respond to the theatre experience, creating at the broadest level a sensitive and enriched audience.

  32. French Cinema: The Student's Book

    Alan J. Singerman

    French Cinema: The Student's Book

    French Cinema: A Student's Book is an introduction to French cinema, in English. This text includes the history of the origins of French film, an explanation of how to analyze a film, a lexicon of French cinema terms, and an analysis of 17 major masterpieces of French filmmaking. A parallel French version of this text, Apprentissage du cinema francais, is also available, so the same course can be taught to students of French culture as well as students of French language.

  33. Frogs

    Aristophanes
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Jeffrey Henderson

    Frogs

    "Overall . . . I find this translation of the Frogs to be entertaining and very readable. Furthermore, Henderson's comprehensive introduction makes this translation quite useful for general readers or students at any level."
        —Erin K. Moodie, Bryn Mawr Classical Review

  34. Hamlet

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Bernice W. Kliman and James H. Lake
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Hamlet

    "Shakespeare scholars Bernice W. Kliman and James H. Lake have carried out the important task of not only bringing up to date the text of Hamlet as edited in the last century by the celebrated Shakespearean George Lyman Kittredge but also retaining its significant features. The editors' discerning analyses of performances by Mel Gibson, Kenneth Branah, Michael Almereyda, and Simon Russell Beale drive home the point that Hamlet today remains alive but restless and unpredictable. It exemplifies Ben Johnson's Shakespeare, who '. . . was not of an age, but for all time!'"
         —Kenneth Sprague Rothwell, (1921-2010), was Professor Emeritus, University of Vermont

  35. Hecuba

    Euripides
    Translated, with Introduction and Commentary, by Robin Mitchell-Boyask

    Hecuba

    Euripides Hecuba is one of the few tragedies that evoke a sense of utter desolation and destruction in the audience. The drama focuses on the status of women, those who are out of power and at the margins of society, by enacting the sufferings of Hecuba. With the city of Troy fallen, Hecuba and Polyxena, her daughter, are enslaved to Agamemnon. Hecuba is despondent with the news that Polyxena is chosen to be sacrificed at the tomb of Achilles. After the sacrifice, the body of her son Polydorus, already a ghost at the start of the drama, is discovered. Polymestor, a king in Thrace who Hecuba sent Polydorus to for safety reasons, murdered Polydorus for his gold. With the tacit complicity of Agamemnon, Hecuba plots her revenge against Polymestor. What transpires next has lasting implications for all involved, including a dramatic trial scene and Hecubas ultimate metamorphosis.

  36. Heracles

    Euripides
    Edited by Michael Halleran

    Heracles

    Euripides' Heracles is an extraordinary play, innovative in its treatment of the myth, bold in its dramatic structure, and filled with affective human pathos. The play tells a tale of horror: Heracles, the greatest hero of the Greeks, is maddened by the gods to murder his wife and children. But this suffering and divine malevolence are leavened by the friendship between Heracles and Theseus, which allows the hero to survive this final and most painful labor. The Heracles raises profound questions about the gods and mortal values in a capricious and harsh world. 

  37. Hippolytus

    Euripides
    Translated with Notes, Introduction, and Essay by Michael R. Halleran

    Hippolytus

    No play of Euripides is more admired than Hippolytus. The tale of a married woman stirred to passion for a younger man was traditional, but Euripides modified this story and blended it with one of divine vengeance to create a masterpiece of tension, pathos, and dramatic power. In this play, Phaedra fights nobly but unsuccessfully against her desire for her stepson Hippolytus, while the young man risks his life to keep her passion secret. Both of them, constrained by the overwhelming force of divine power and human ignorance, choose to die in order to maintain their virtue and their good names.

  38. Julius Caesar

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Sarah Hatchuel
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Julius Caesar

    "The New Kittredge Series is both a delight and a steal. Kittredge's textual authority, updated by eminent scholars sensitive to classroom needs and alert to staging choices, is once again available in these slim, elegant, inexpensive, user-friendly volumes. With lucid notes and incisive introductions geared especially to popular film versions, the series also offers an overview of both stage and film performances of each play. A must for any Shakespeare class."
         —Laury Magnus

  39. King Henry the Sixth: Parts I, II, and III

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Annalisa Castaldo
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    King Henry the Sixth: Parts I, II, and III

    George Lyman Kittredge's insightful editions of Shakespeare have endured in part because of his eclecticism, his diversity of interests, and his wide-ranging accomplishments—all of which are reflected in the valuable notes in each volume. The plays in the New Kittredge Shakespeare series retain the original Kittredge notes and introductions, changed or augmented only when some modernization seems necessary. These new editions also include introductory essays by contemporary editors, notes on the plays as they have been performed on stage and film, and additional student materials.

  40. King John & Henry VIII

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by James H. Lake, Courtney Lehmann, and Jane Wells
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    King John & Henry VIII

    "This is a terrific edition that really brings King John and Henry VIII to life. Consistently inviting student participation, the edition makes the plays wonderfully accessible, through explanations of the language, descriptions of context, topic guides, plot outlines, illustrations, and genealogies. A particular strength is the emphasis on performance. Thanks to the insightful histories provided, King John and Henry VIII are richly illuminated as stage and screen creations, allowing for genuinely imaginative engagement with these most fascinating Shakespearean dramas."
         —Ramona Wray, Reader in English at Queen's University, Belfast

  41. King Lear

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Kenneth S. Rothwell
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    King Lear

    "By adding comments on recorded performances to Kittredge's notes . . . [which] were fun and helpful to my early study of Shakespeare . . . Kenneth Sprague Rothwell gives students and researchers the means to explore how performance can elucidate 'the script' of King Lear."
         —Harry Keyishian, Fairleigh Dickinson University

  42. King Oidipous

    Sophocles
    Translated, with Introduction and Essay, by Ruby Blondell

    King Oidipous

    This is an English translation of Sophocles' famous tragedy of Oedipus and the fate he so much tries to avoid. Focus Classical Library provides close translations with notes and essays to provide access to understanding Greek culture.

  43. King Richard II

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Thomas A. Pendleton
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    King Richard II

    "An extraordinary artistic achievement, Richard II remains one of Shakespeare's most satisfyingly ambiguous plays and expertly-penned exercises in shifting audience sympathies. Pendleton's even-handed introduction and judicious supplements to Kittredge's annotations lay out the play's issues in a way that make its delightful poignancy even more available to readers. Especially useful are Pendleton’s extensive in-text performance notes, which recount how film versions deal with the challenges and possibilities the play presents."
         —James Wells, Muskingum University

  44. King Richard the Third

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Jacquelyn Kilpatrick
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    King Richard the Third

    "In this splendid edition, Jacquelyn Kilpatrick gives us a comprehensive primer on Shakespeare's performance craft and an ideal text for teaching Richard III, particularly to students new to Shakespeare. Her introductory materials make a century of scholarship and filmmaking both accessible to the newcomer and illuminating for the experienced student or performer. Her keen understanding of the original performance circumstances of Shakespeare's plays and insightful accounts of salient stage and film productions work together to open up the rich array of possibilities and choices in performance, both then and now."
         —Catherine S. Burriss, California State University, Channel Islands

  45. La casa de Bernarda Alba

    Federico García Lorca
    Edited by Paola Bianco and Antonio Sobejano-Morán

    La casa de Bernarda Alba

    Federico García Lorca's 1945 drama is set in a small Spanish village, where the five daughters of a tyrannical mother struggle against her strict control. The play explores themes of repression, passion, and conformity, and the effects of love upon men upon women. This edition is designed to help students approach the original Spanish text through an introductory essay, vocabulary and cultural notes, and study questions. All material is in Spanish, and complete in one volume, appropriate as an introductory text for Spanish language courses in literature and culture.

  46. Love's Labour's Lost

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Jill P. Ingram
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Love's Labour's Lost

    "This student-friendly edition of a difficult play includes a clear, helpful introduction and notes elucidating the complicated imagery and wordplay. Notes and illustrations refer the reader to various staging options enabling him or her to imagine Love’s Labour’s Lost in performance."
         —Katharine E. Maus, James Branch Cabell Professor of English Literature, University of Virginia

  47. Lysistrata (Henderson Edition)

    Aristophanes
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Jeffrey Henderson

    Lysistrata (Henderson Edition)

    Henderson's English translation of Lysistrata, the most popular of Aristophanes' plays, appeals to the modern reader because of its lively and imaginative plot, strong and memorable heroine, good jokes, and appeal for peace and tolerance between nations and between the sexes. Jeffery Henderson, noted Greek scholar, puts the work in historical and cultural context in his comprehensive introduction. Suggestions for further reading, notes, and map are also included.

  48. PNG

    Aristophanes
    Translated, with Introduction, Notes, and Commentaries, by Sarah Ruden

    Lysistrata (Ruden Edition)

    "Presents a readable, clear translation with the assistance students will need to understand this play and the society that produced it. . . . A worthy addition to Hackett's growing series of translations of classical literature in accessible editions."
         —Anne Mahoney, New England Classical Journal

  49. Macbeth

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Annalisa Castaldo
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Macbeth

    "Seventy years after their publication, George Lyman Kittredge's editions of Shakespeare remain exceptional for the combination of learning, acuity, wit, and clarity he brings to his notes on the plays. Annalisa Castaldo makes Kittredge's Macbeth even more useful for modern readers by skillfully streamlining Kittredge's annotations and adding helpful analyses of the play and its film productions. There is no better edition of Shakespeare for students, beginning or advanced."
         —Dr. James Wells

  50. Measure for Measure

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Bernice W. Kliman and Laury Magnus
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Measure for Measure

    "This most problematic of Shakespeare's plays, a comedy filled with dark corners, has been beautifully presented by Laury Magnus and the late Bernice Kliman. Scholars will admire their editorial skill while students will benefit greatly from their ample notes, useful timeline of the play's plot, and cogent performance history. As the editors explain, the fiercely interlocked themes of the play—sex, money, justice, and religion—make this play a measure not only of Shakespeare's time but of our own."
         —Anthony DiMatteo, New York Institute of Technology

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