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Philosophy in the Middle Ages (Third Edition)

The Christian, Islamic, and Jewish Traditions

Edited, with Introduction, by Arthur Hyman, James J. Walsh, & Thomas Williams

2010 - 724 pp.

Format ISBN Price Qty
Cloth (no dust jacket) 978-1-60384-209-9
$79.00
Paper 978-1-60384-208-2
$50.00
Examination 978-1-60384-208-2
$5.00

Quick Overview

The third edition builds on the strengths of the second by preserving its essential shape while adding several important new texts—including works by Augustine, Boethius, Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite, Anselm, al-Fārābī, al-Ghazālī, Ibn Rushd, Bonaventure, Thomas Aquinas, and John Duns Scotus—and featuring new translations of many others. The volume has also been redesigned and its bibliographies updated with the needs of a new generation of students in mind.

OR

eBook available for $37.95. Click HERE for more information.

Thomas Williams’ revision of Arthur Hyman and James J. Walsh’s classic compendium of writings in the Christian, Islamic, and Jewish medieval philosophical traditions expands the breadth of coverage that helped make its predecessor the best known and most widely used collection of its kind.

The third edition builds on the strengths of the second by preserving its essential shape while adding several important new texts—including works by Augustine, Boethius, Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite, Anselm, al-Fārābī, al-Ghazālī, Ibn Rushd, Bonaventure, Thomas Aquinas, and John Duns Scotus—and featuring new translations of many others.

The volume has also been redesigned and its bibliographies updated with the needs of a new generation of students in mind.

 

Contents:

Preface to the third edition; Introduction

EARLY MEDIEVAL CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY

Augustine:

  • The Teacher (complete)
  • On Free Choice of the Will 2.3–3.6
  • Reconsiderations 1.9
  • On the Trinity 15.12.21
  • Confessions 2.4–2.10
  • Confessions 7.9–7.16
  • Confessions 11.3–11.28
  • City of God 19.3–19.28

Boethius:

  • The Consolation of Philosophy 3.9–end
  • Contra Eutychen 1.1–1.71
  • On the Trinity 1.7–2.58

Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite:

  • The Mystical Theology (complete)

John Scottus Eriugena:

  • On the Division of Nature

Anselm:

  • Monologion 1–4
  • Proslogion and the Exchange with Gaunilo

Peter Abelard:

  • Glosses on Porphyry
  • Ethics, or Know Thyself


ISLAMIC PHILOSOPHY

Al-Fārābī:

  • The Principles of Existing Things (complete)

Ibn Sīnā:

  • The Salvation, "Metaphysics" 2.1–2.5, 2.12, 2.13, 2.18, 2.19
  • The Cure, "Metaphysics" 6.1–6.2
  • The Salvation, "Psychology" 6.9, 6.12, 6.13
  • The Cure, "The Soul" 5.7

Al-Ghazālī:

  • The Incoherence of the Philosophers, On the Eternity of the World
  • The Incoherence of the Philosophers, Concerning the Natural Sciences

Ibn Rushd:

  • The Decisive Treatise (complete)
  • Long Commentary on "The Soul" 3.4
  • Long Commentary on "The Soul" 3.5, 3.18–3.20
  • The Incoherence of "The Incoherence"

 

JEWISH PHILOSOPHY

Saadia:

  • Book of Doctrines and Beliefs 1.1–1.3, 3.1–3.3

Solomon ibn Gabirol:

  • Selections from The Fountain of Life

Moses Maimonides:

  • Selections from The Guide of the Perplexed

Levi ben Gershom (Gersonides):

  • The Wars of the Lord 3.1–3.6

Hasdai Crescas:

  • The Light of the Lord 2.6.1

 

LATIN PHILOSOPHY IN THE THIRTEENTH CENTURY

Bonaventure:

  • Conferences on the Hexaemeron 3.7
  • Conferences on the Hexaemeron 1.3
  • The Mind's Journey into God (complete)

Siger of Brabant:

  • Question on the Eternity of the World (complete)

Thomas Aquinas:

  • On Being and Essence
  • Selections from the "Treatise on God"
  • Selections from the "Treatise on Creation"
  • Selections from the "Treatise on Human Nature"
  • Selections from the "Treatise on Happiness"
  • Selections from the "Treatise on Virtue"
  • Selections from the "Treatise on Law"

The Condemnation of 1277:

  • Condemnation of 219 Propositions

 

LATIN PHILOSOPHY IN THE FOURTEENTH CENTURY

John Duns Scotus:

  • The Existence of an Infinite Being
  • The Possibility of Knowing God
  • Against Illumination and Skepticism
  • Intuitive and Abstractive Cognition
  • Universals and Individuation
  • Contingency and the Divine Will
  • Freedom and the Fall
  • The Goodness of Moral Acts
  • The Decalogue and the Natural Law

William Ockham:

  • Selections from Summa logicae, Part One
  • Universals and Individuation
  • Intuitive and Abstractive Cognition
  • Relations
  • Motion
  • Projectile Motion
  • Efficient and Final Causality
  • The Connection of the Virtues

Nicholas of Autrecourt:

  • Letters to Bernard of Arezzo

Marsilius of Padua:

  • The Defender of Peace

John Buridan:

  • Certainty and Truth
  • Knowledge
  • Essence and Existence
  • Motion
  • Happiness

 

 About the Authors:

Arthur Hyman is Distinguished Service Professor of Philosophy, Bernard Revel Graduate School, Yeshiva University.

James J. Walsh was Professor of Philosophy, Columbia University.

Thomas Williams is Professor of Catholic Studies and Professor of Philosophy, University of South Florida.