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  1. Vindication_PNG

    Mary Wollstonecraft
    Edited, with an Introduction and Notes, by Philip Barnard and Stephen Shapiro

    A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

    "A thoughtful and useful abridgement of an essential historical, political, and philosophical text. [Barnard and Shapiro] have managed to preserve the tone and arguments of the original while shedding much of the redundancy and lengthy quotations of external sources that can be off-putting and cumbersome for today's readers. The explanatory footnotes added to the text are helpful without being overbearing."
         —Katrin Schultheiss, George Washington University

  2. Addresses to the German Nation

    Johann Gottlieb Fichte
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Isaac Nakhimovsky, Béla Kapossy, and Keith Tribe

    Addresses to the German Nation

    This new edition of the Addresses is designed to make Fichte’s arguments more accessible to English-speaking readers. The clear, readable, and reliable translation is accompanied by a chronology of the events surrounding Fichte’s life, suggestions for further reading, and an index. The groundbreaking introductory essay situates Fichte’s theory of the nation state in the history of modern political thought. It provides historians, political theorists, and other students of nationalism with a fresh perspective for considering the interface between cosmopolitanism and republicanism, patriotism and nationalism.

  3. Afro-Latino Voices, Shorter Edition

    Edited by Kathryn Joy McKnight & Leo J. Garofalo

    Afro-Latino Voices, Shorter Edition

    Ideally suited for use in broad, swift-moving surveys of Latin American and Caribbean history, this abridgment of McKnight and Garofalo's Afro-Latino Voices: Narratives from the Early Modern Ibero-Atlantic World, 1550-1812 (2009) includes all of the English translations, introductions, and annotation created for that volume.

  4. Ancient Rome

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Christopher Francese and R. Scott Smith

    Ancient Rome

    "Terrific . . . exactly the sort of collection we have long needed: one offering a wide range of texts, both literary and documentary, and that—with the inclusion of Sulpicia and Perpetua—allows students to hear the voices of actual women from the ancient world. The translations themselves are fluid; the inclusion of long extracts allows students to sink their teeth into material in ways not possible with traditional source books. The anonymous texts, inscriptions, and other non-literary material topically arranged in the 'Documentary' section will enable students to see how the documentary evidence supplements or undermines the views advanced in the literary texts. This is a book that should be of great use to anyone teaching a survey of the history of Ancient Rome or a Roman Civilization course. I look forward to teaching with this book which is, I think, the best source book I have seen for the way we teach these days."
         —David Potter, University of Michigan

  5. Civil War

    Lucan
    Translated by Brian Walters
    Introduction by W.R. Johnson

    Civil War

    "Brian Walters has given us what too few translators of classical poetry do—an authorial presence. Here is Lucan himself in all his drastic modes—everything from his enraged indignation to his paradoxical aphorisms—recreating the ruptured Neronian world he lived in as he recounts the nefarious civil war that destroyed the Roman Republic."
         —Stanley Lombardo, University of Kansas

  6. Daily Life of the Ancient Greeks (Second Edition)

    Robert Garland

    Daily Life of the Ancient Greeks (Second Edition)

    Significantly expanded and updated in light of the most recent scholarship, the second edition of Garland's engaging introduction to ancient Greek society brings this world vividly to life—and, in doing so, explores the perspectives and morals of typical ancient Greek citizens across a wide range of societal levels. Food and drink, literacy, the plight of the elderly, the treatment of slaves, and many more aspects of daily life in ancient Greece also come into sharp focus. More than sixty illustrations are included, as are maps, a chronology, a glossary of Greek terms, and suggestions for further reading.

  7. European Romanticism

    Warren Breckman

    European Romanticism

    "The introductory essay is superb, the best short introduction to Romanticism I know. It is comprehensive, covering both the wide range of spheres that Romanticism affected—literature, philosophy, art, music, politics, nationalism—and the broad spectrum of European countries in which it was an influential cultural current. It offers a distinctive, unified interpretation of Romanticism that nonetheless does justice to the complexities of Romantic ideas."
        —Gerald Izenberg, Washington University in St. Louis

  8. Florence in the Age of the Medici and Savonarola, 1464–1498

    Florence in the Age of the Medici and Savonarola, 1464–1498

    Forthcoming - March 2018

    Series: Passages: Key Moments in History

    "A brief narrative overview of the mainly political history of Florence to the end of the fifteenth century that also offers an attractive collection of illustrative documents, aimed to engage student interest and discussion."
    —Melissa Bullard, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

  9. Histories

    Herodotus
    Translated by Pamela Mensch
    Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by James Romm

    Histories

    "This edition reproduces the fluent pace and readability of Herodotus' world-encompassing work. Mensch has produced a close translation of Herodotus' Greek that is also an engrossing read in English. As an old-time Herodotean, I found myself drawn into Herodotus' universe of history and story all over again. Combined with Romm's elegant introduction, which conveys the lure of Herodotus' work, the lucid maps and tables, and the pertinent, uncluttered notes, this is an edition to read for pleasure and for education. I recommend it to future students of Herodotus and their instructors, and to any reader who wants to discover and rediscover Herodotus in a vibrant new translation."
        —Emily Greenwood, Yale University

  10. Matteo Ricci and the Catholic Mission to China, 1583–1610

    R. Po-chia Hsia

    Matteo Ricci and the Catholic Mission to China, 1583–1610

    Series: Passages: Key Moments in History

    "A highly accessible introduction to the history of the Jesuits in China. Hsia offers a clear and concise overview of the key figures in this crucial episode of intercultural encounter: the first intellectual and cultural meeting of Europeans and Chinese. . . . In addition to providing a broad vision of the European and Asian contexts for Ricci’s work in the introductory essay, Hsia gives a valuable selection of documents from both Chinese and Western sources in translation . . . [including] items that genuinely demonstrate the two sides of this cultural exchange."
         —Liam Matthew Brockey, Professor of History, Michigan State University

     

  11. On the Freedom of a Christian

    Martin Luther
    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Tryntje Helfferich

    On the Freedom of a Christian

    "The translations are accurate and clear, and the introductory essay does a wonderful job of distilling complicated theological controversies into terms that are comprehensible by an undergraduate audience. The edition's greatest asset, though, is the range of texts that it includes. By including works by Luther's Catholic opponents and his erstwhile allies, this edition demonstrates that On the Freedom of a Christian represented not only a high point in Luther's thought, but also a starting point in a debate that spanned Christendom and had massive social and political implications."
         —Philip Haberkern, Boston University

  12. Persian Letters (MacKenzie Edition)

    Montesquieu
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Raymond N. MacKenzie

    Persian Letters (MacKenzie Edition)

    "An excellent edition that will give students a clean, well-translated text without too much clutter. The introduction is magisterial."
        —Srinivas Aravamudan, Duke University

  13. Protests in the Streets: 1968 Across the Globe

    Edited by Elaine Carey
    General Editor: Alfred J. Andrea

    Protests in the Streets: 1968 Across the Globe

    Series: Critical Themes in World History

    "A really interesting and provocative take on 1968. This book addresses the truly global dimensions—and the unexpected, often long-term consequences—of that year of protest. It’s an original and highly usable comparative history sure to attract student interest." —Peter N. Stearns, George Mason University

  14. Race and Ethnicity in the Classical World

    Selected and Translated by Rebecca F. Kennedy, C. Sydnor Roy, and Max L. Goldman

    Race and Ethnicity in the Classical World

    "This highly affordable, lively and wide-ranging anthology will be an invaluable study resource for courses on ancient identities and ideas about foreigners. . . . It will also appeal to the general reader interested in exploring what Greeks and Romans thought and wrote about peoples often styled 'barbarian,' not least because knowledge of such material was instrumental in the formation of the modern disciplines of anthropology, ethnography and geography. Both the high quality of the translation and the fact that it presents sizable chunks of text for students to ponder make it an ideal teaching text. Wild flights of fancy, tales of mythical monstrosity and cruel/bizarre stereotypes sit side-by-side. Dicaeopolis's response seems the most apt: 'Wowzers!'"
         —Journal of Classics Teaching

  15. Reformation Thought

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Margaret L. King

    Reformation Thought

    "A highly approachable collection of selections both canonical (but not less important for that; one can’t teach the Reformation without key texts from Erasmus, Luther, Calvin, et al.) and less well known. The latter texts—from Mantova, Melancthon, Beza, Riedeman, Campion, Hoby, Pole, and others—are illuminating and useful in every case. The decision to carry the story to the late seventeenth and even eighteenth century and bring in the overseas perspective was an excellent one. King’s characteristic ability to choose important pieces—and translate and annotate them accurately and well—is on full display here. The introductions to the chapters and to the individual selections are well written and concise." —Thomas Kuehn, Clemson University

    Click here to see the complete Table of Contents (PDF).

  16. Renaissance Humanism

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Margaret L. King

    Renaissance Humanism

    "By far the best collection of sources to introduce readers to Renaissance humanism in all its many guises. What distinguishes this stimulating and useful anthology is the vision behind it: King shows that Renaissance thinkers had a lot to say, not only about the ancient world—one of their habitual passions—but also about the self, how civic experience was configured, the arts, the roles and contributions of women, the new science, the 'new' world, and so much more."
         —Christopher S. Celenza, Johns Hopkins University

  17. Seven Myths of Africa in World History

    David Northrup
    Series Editors: Alfred J. Andrea and Andrew Holt

    Seven Myths of Africa in World History

    Series: Myths of History

    "Northrup’s highly accessible book breaks through the most common barriers that readers encounter in studying African history. Each chapter takes on a common myth about Africa and explains both the sources of the myth and the research that debunks it. These provocative chapters will promote lively discussions among readers while deepening their understanding of African and world history. The book is strengthened by its incorporation of actors and issues representing the African diaspora and African Americans in particular." —Rebecca Shumway, College of Charleston

  18. Seven Myths of Native American History

    Paul Jentz; Series General Editors: Alfred J. Andrea and Andrew Holt

    Seven Myths of Native American History

    Forthcoming - March 2018

    Series: Myths of History

     "Seven Myths of Native American History will provide undergraduates and general readers with a very useful introduction to Native America past and present. Jentz identifies the origins and remarkable staying power of these myths at the same time he exposes and dismantles them."
    Colin G. Calloway, Dartmouth College

  19. Seven Myths of the Civil War

    Edited, with an Introduction, by Wesley Moody; Series Editors: Alfred J. Andrea and Andrew Holt

    Seven Myths of the Civil War

    Series: Myths of History

    "Readers of this book who thought they knew a lot about the U.S. Civil War will discover that much of what they 'knew' is wrong. For readers whose previous knowledge is sketchy but whose desire to learn is strong, the separation of myth from reality is an important step toward mastering the subject. The essays will generate lively discussion and new insights." —James M. McPherson, Professor Emeritus, Princeton University

  20. Seven Myths of the Crusades

    Edited, with an Introduction and Epilogue, by Alfred J. Andrea and Andrew Holt

    Seven Myths of the Crusades

    Series: Myths of History

    "Crusade historians frequently lament the wide gulf that separates modern scholarship from popular beliefs regarding the holy wars of the Middle Ages. In this lively book a group of those scholars tackle seven of the most intractable myths that obscure our view of the crusades. With erudition, energy, and a dose of humility this book makes the case that solid historical research brings us ever closer to historical accuracy—and that matters. The myths of the crusades may be legion, but breaking down seven of them is an excellent place to start."
          —Thomas F. Madden, St. Louis University

  21. Shackles of Iron: Slavery Beyond the Atlantic

    Stewart Gordon
    General Editor: Alfred J. Andrea

    Shackles of Iron: Slavery Beyond the Atlantic

    Series: Critical Themes in World History

    "Gordon’s survey of the topic makes it clear that slavery in the Americas can be understood much better if we put it in this larger context, in terms of both time and place. His chapters on East African and Mediterranean slavery are especially valuable, since these were contemporary with so-called Atlantic slavery and can provide students with valid points of comparison, revealing both the similarities and the variable nature of early-modern bondage. The final chapter is especially timely, reminding readers that much of what we think of as enslavement hasn’t really gone away, but simply slipped below the radar of the world media. All in all, Gordon makes it clear that, though it has arisen in different guises and at many different times and places, slavery has been and remains deeply rooted in human society. A rewarding introduction for anyone looking to better understand slavery as a world-wide institution."
         —Robert Davis, The Ohio State University

  22. The Accessible Federalist

    Adapted, with Introduction, by S. Adam Seagrave

    The Accessible Federalist

    "I assign students to read The Federalist so they will grasp the ideas. But too often they can’t get past the words. Adam Seagrave's The Accessible Federalist will enable readers of all backgrounds to understand the ideas that shaped the Constitution. It will also spur many readers onward to study and appreciate the original texts. I hope it gets wide attention and classroom use." —James H. Read, Professor of Political Science, College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University

  23. The American Debate over Slavery, 1760–1865

    Edited, with an Introduction and Notes, by Howard L. Lubert, Kevin R. Hardwick, and Scott J. Hammond

    The American Debate over Slavery, 1760–1865

    "The American Debate over Slavery, 1760–1865 will be a superb resource for teachers and students of early American history. Editors Lubert, Hardwick, and Hammond have carefully assembled and introduced a rich collection of significant documents that bring the slavery debate into sharp and illuminating focus. This is easily the best book in its field." —Peter S. Onuf, University of Virginia and Thomas Jefferson Foundation (Monticello)

  24. The Description of the World

    Marco Polo
    Translated, with an Introduction and Annotations, by Sharon Kinoshita

    The Description of the World

    "Marco Polo’s account provided both what was thought to be a reliable guide to East Asia—Columbus carried with him a heavily annotated copy of Marco Polo’s work during his own expedition to the Americas—and an intriguingly fantastical account that for centuries has continued to fuel the imagination of poets and artists. Kinoshita’s superb, groundbreaking translation brilliantly renders into modern English this crucial text of the Middle Ages. Indispensable in the undergraduate and graduate classroom, The Description of the World will also appeal to a wide range of readers curious about the medieval encounter of East and West."
         —Suzanne Conklin Akbari, University of Toronto

  25. The East India Company, 1600–1858

    Ian Barrow

    The East India Company, 1600–1858

    Series: Passages: Key Moments in History

    "Ian Barrow has written a concise yet engaging, rich, and detailed history of the East India Company—its rise to power, evolution, and eventual demise. This book will be read with great interest by students as well as those general readers seeking a better knowledge of the world's first multi-national corporation and its important influence in the creation of the modern South Asian world."  —Michael Dodson, Indiana University Bloomington

  26. The Essential Díaz

    Bernal Díaz del Castillo
    Translated, with an Introduction and Notes, by Janet Burke and Ted Humphrey

    The Essential Díaz

    Ideally suited for use in swift-moving surveys of World, Atlantic, and Latin American history, this abridgment of Ted Humphrey and Janet Burke’s 2012 translation of the True History provides key excerpts from Diaz’s text and concise summaries of omitted passages. Included in this edition is a new preface outlining the social, economic, and political forces that motivated the European “discovery” of the New World.

  27. The Essential Douglass

    Frederick Douglass
    Edited, with an Introduction, by Nicholas Buccola

    The Essential Douglass

    "For years I have wanted a compact, carefully edited collection of Frederick Douglass’ writings and speeches spanning his whole career—from the antebellum years to the Civil War and Reconstruction to the retreat from racial democracy in the 1870s, ’80s, and ’90s. Finally, in Nicholas Buccola’s expertly edited The Essential Douglass: Selected Writings & Speeches, I have it. Buccola has done teachers and scholars of American political thought a tremendous service by making a truly representative selection of Douglass’ achievement available in an affordable volume. I am excited to assign this book to my students and share with them the full breadth of Douglass’ intellectual fire."
         —Jack Turner, University of Washington

  28. The Essential Thirty Years War

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Tryntje Helfferich

    The Essential Thirty Years War

    This abridgment of Tryntje Helfferich's acclaimed 2009 anthology The Thirty Years War features an expanded General Introduction and annotation designed to support student readings in swift-moving surveys of European and World history.

  29. The Haitian Revolution

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by David Geggus

    The Haitian Revolution

    "A landmark collection of documents by the field's leading scholar. This reader includes beautifully written introductions and a fascinating array of never-before-published primary documents. These treasures from the archives offer a new picture of colonial Saint-Domingue and the Haitian Revolution. The translations are lively and colorful."
         —Alyssa Sepinwall, California State University San Marcos

  30. The Journal of Wu Yubi

    Wu Yubi
    Translated, with Introduction and Commentary, by Theresa Kelleher

    The Journal of Wu Yubi

    In this rare firsthand account of an individual's pursuit of sagehood, the early Ming dynasty scholar and teacher Wu Yubi chronicles his progress and his setbacks, as he strives to integrate the Neo-Confucian practices of self-examination and self-cultivation into everyday life. In more than three hundred entries, spanning much of his adult life, Wu paints a vivid picture, not only of the life of the mind, but also of the life of a teacher of modest means, struggling to make ends meet in a rural community.

  31. The Political Thought of African Independence

    Edited, with an Introduction, by Gregory Smulewicz-Zucker
    With the Assistance of Chelsea Schields

    The Political Thought of African Independence

    "A great accomplishment. Not only does Smulewicz-Zucker's anthology bring together a diverse array of sources (54 in total), it also weaves together what are more or less canonical sources in twentieth-century African political thought with many unexpected, yet equally rich and illuminating, items. Smulewicz-Zucker has chosen material from all of the continent’s major regions, including . . . documents from more than two-dozen different countries, international and regional organizations, and conferences. Moreover, he has organized the material in a way that creates an engaging and powerful narrative articulating the complicated history of African independence. This outstanding collection will surely find its way into undergraduate courses in fields as diverse as African history, international relations, comparative politics, and even political theory."  —Jeffrey Ahlman, Smith College

  32. The Russian Revolution and Its Global Impact

    Jonathan Daly and Leonid Trofimov

    The Russian Revolution and Its Global Impact

    Series: Passages: Key Moments in History

    "Thoughtful, readable, and concise, this little book sets the Russian Revolution in its global context. Though primarily focused on the period from 1917 to the 1930s, it nicely illustrates the many ways in which the effects of the Revolution are still being felt today." —Rex Wade, George Mason University

    For more on the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution read Jonathan Daly and Leonid Trofimov's post Commemorating the Russian Revolution from Vladimir Lenin to Vladimir Putin on the Hackett Publishing blog, The Hackett Colloquium.  

  33. The Trial of Galileo

    Translated and Edited by Maurice A. Finocchiaro

    The Trial of Galileo

    "Finocchiaro is the foremost scholar and translator of Galileo's works and this book an invaluable collection of key documents concerning the 'greatest scandal of Christendom'—the trial and condemnation of the founder of modern science as a heretic by the Roman Inquisition in 1633. The book follows and complements Finocchiaro's magisterial work Retrying Galileo: 1633-1992, and provides essential, original source material concerning the facts and issues indispensable for scholars, students and educated lay persons. Finocchiaro’s masterly introductory essay provides a valuable guide to the history and issues, particularly helping to dispel the many myths regarding the scientific, philosophical, theological and political issues raised by Galileo’s trial. An unrivaled resource for understanding the 'Galileo Affair'."
         —Peter Slezak, University of New South Wales

  34. The Wars of Justinian

    Prokopios
    Translated by H. B. Dewing; Revised and Modernized, with an Introduction and Notes, by Anthony Kaldellis; Maps and Genealogies by Ian Mladjov

    The Wars of Justinian

    "At last . . . the translation that we have needed for so long: a fresh, lively, readable, and faithful rendering of Prokopios' Wars, which in a single volume will make this fundamental work of late ancient history-writing accessible to a whole new generation of students."
         —Jonathan Conant, Brown University

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