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New in Asian Studies

11 Item(s)

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  1. A Pioneer in Yokohama

    C.T. Assendelft de Coningh
    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Martha Chaiklin

    A Pioneer in Yokohama

    "A great read—I couldn’t put it down! A Pioneer in Yokohama truly brings the earliest months of the Japanese treaty port to life. From the brief Japanese 'Gold Rush' to duels and terrorist attacks, from the perils of international commerce to hilarious problems of translation and miscommunication, Dutchman De Coningh’s memoir provides vivid insights into both nineteenth-century trade and Yokohama’s international community. Moreover, the extraordinary sleuth work done by translator Chaiklin to identify even the most preposterous-seeming events and characters adds the spice of historical confirmation to the drama. . . . A great resource for researchers, classrooms, and casual readers alike."
         —Sarah Thal, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  2. PNG

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Wilt L. Idema
    and Stephen H. West

    Battles, Betrayals, and Brotherhood

     "Battles, Betrayals, and Brotherhood is a brilliant introduction to one of China’s best-loved heroic traditions. And of course the translations are wonderful—very lively!"
         —Katherine Carlitz, University of Pittsburgh

  3. Introduction to Classical Chinese Philosophy

    Bryan W. Van Norden

    Introduction to Classical Chinese Philosophy

     “This book is an introduction in the very best sense of the word. It provides the beginner with an accurate, sophisticated, yet accessible account, and offers new insights and challenging perspectives to those who have more specialized knowledge. Focusing on the period in Chinese philosophy that is surely most easily approachable and perhaps is most important, it ranges over of rich set of competing options. It also, with admirable self-consciousness, presents a number of daring attempts to relate those options to philosophical figures and movements from the West. I recommend it very highly.”
        —Lee H. Yearley, Walter Y. Evans-Wentz Professor, Religious Studies, Stanford University

  4. Master Sun's Art of War

    Sun Tzu
    Translated, with Introduction, by Philip J. Ivanhoe

    Master Sun's Art of War

    “P. J. Ivanhoe is one of the English-speaking world’s foremost translators and interpreters of classical Chinese philosophical texts. His translation of the Sunzi Bingfa reads beautifully, adorned only by sobering photographic plates of the famed terracotta army of the first Qin emperor that turn one back to the text in a properly reflective mood. The Introduction and endnotes are blessedly spare, providing just the right amount of interpretive scholarship to assist comprehension of the text, while not interfering with its intrinsic simplicity, clarity, and profundity.”
        —Sumner B. Twiss, Distinguished Professor of Human Rights, Ethics, and Religion, Florida State University

  5. Matteo Ricci and the Catholic Mission to China, 1583–1610

    R. Po-chia Hsia

    Matteo Ricci and the Catholic Mission to China, 1583–1610

    Series: Passages: Key Moments in History

    "A highly accessible introduction to the history of the Jesuits in China. Hsia offers a clear and concise overview of the key figures in this crucial episode of intercultural encounter: the first intellectual and cultural meeting of Europeans and Chinese. . . . In addition to providing a broad vision of the European and Asian contexts for Ricci’s work in the introductory essay, Hsia gives a valuable selection of documents from both Chinese and Western sources in translation . . . [including] items that genuinely demonstrate the two sides of this cultural exchange."
         —Liam Matthew Brockey, Professor of History, Michigan State University

     

  6. Readings in Later Chinese Philosophy

    Edited by Justin Tiwald and Bryan W. Van Norden

    Readings in Later Chinese Philosophy

    An exceptional contribution to the teaching and study of Chinese thought, this anthology provides fifty-eight selections arranged chronologically in five main sections: Han Thought, Chinese Buddhism, Neo-Confucianism, Late Imperial Confucianism, and the early Twentieth Century. The editors have selected writings that have been influential, that are philosophically engaging, and that can be understood as elements of an ongoing dialogue, particularly on issues regarding ethical cultivation, human nature, virtue, government, and the underlying structure of the universe. Within those topics, issues of contemporary interest, such as Chinese ideas about gender and the experiences of women, are brought to light.

  7. Records of the Three Kingdoms in Plain Language

    Translated, with Introduction and Annotations, by Wilt L. Idema and Stephen H. West

    Records of the Three Kingdoms in Plain Language

    "Idema and West have been collaborating on the production of scholarly works on, and translations of, Chinese vernacular literature for decades and their work has set a very high standard for scholarly value, accuracy, and readability. This is their second volume on popular treatments of the famous Three Kingdoms period, a fascinating age that has dominated as a topic both traditional Chinese fiction and drama. . . . Records of the Three Kingdoms in Plain Language . . . presents a comprehensive introduction to all of the main characters (Liu Bei, Guan Yu, Zhang Fei, Cao Cao, Zhou Yu, etc.) and events (the Oath in the Peach Garden, The Battle at the Red Cliff, The Single Sword Meeting, etc.) that are so well known in China and deserve to be even better known in the West."  —David Rolston, University of Michigan

  8. Tales from Tang Dynasty China

    Edited, with an Introduction, by Alexei K. Ditter, Jessey J. C. Choo, and Sarah M. Allen

    Tales from Tang Dynasty China

    "This new collection of Tang dynasty tales translated from the Taiping Guangji is an outstanding new resource for students of China. The stories are well-chosen to represent the fascinating breadth of medieval Chinese culture—tales of romance, politics, revenge, and interactions with the supernatural bring to life the richness of medieval religion and society. The translations themselves are accurate and compelling. The authors and translators provide concise, clear introductions to each story and to the volume as a whole, and the collection is carefully organized and indexed so that teachers and students can explore stories on different topics. Lively and accessible to the non-specialist reader, this volume will make a terrific addition to any course on China."
    —Anna M. Shields, Princeton University

  9. PNG

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Patrick Olivelle and Mark McClish

    The Arthaśāstra

    "The translations are the collaborative product of the two leading authorities today on the Arthaśāstra. . . . Their work is consistently, meticulously accurate throughout, yet written in the most straightforward and direct manner imaginable. The material prefatory to each translated section is, again, clear and accessible. . . . Complex matters are effectively distilled in plain language, and the key issues brought out. Superb on all counts. I have been awaiting such a volume for a long time."
         —Timothy Lubin, Washington and Lee University

  10. The East India Company, 1600–1858

    Ian Barrow

    The East India Company, 1600–1858

    Series: Passages: Key Moments in History

    "Ian Barrow has written a concise yet engaging, rich, and detailed history of the East India Company—its rise to power, evolution, and eventual demise. This book will be read with great interest by students as well as those general readers seeking a better knowledge of the world's first multi-national corporation and its important influence in the creation of the modern South Asian world."  —Michael Dodson, Indiana University Bloomington

  11. The Journal of Wu Yubi

    Wu Yubi
    Translated, with Introduction and Commentary, by Theresa Kelleher

    The Journal of Wu Yubi

    In this rare firsthand account of an individual's pursuit of sagehood, the early Ming dynasty scholar and teacher Wu Yubi chronicles his progress and his setbacks, as he strives to integrate the Neo-Confucian practices of self-examination and self-cultivation into everyday life. In more than three hundred entries, spanning much of his adult life, Wu paints a vivid picture, not only of the life of the mind, but also of the life of a teacher of modest means, struggling to make ends meet in a rural community.

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