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Russian Literature in Translation

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  1. Five Russian Stories

    Translated, with Notes and Introduction, by Arna Bronstein and Aleksandra Fleszar

    Five Russian Stories

    Five Russian stories (in English) from the post-Soviet era from among the best modern writers. The stories reflect cultural and political styles and concerns in Russian literature today. Translated with notes and introduction in English.

  2. Four Plays and Three Jokes

    Anton Chekhov
    Translated, with an Introduction and Notes, by Sharon Marie Carnicke

    Four Plays and Three Jokes

    This volume offers lively and accurate translations of Chekhov's major plays and one-acts (complete contents listed below) along with a superb Introduction focused on the plays' remarkably enduring power to elicit the most widely divergent of responses, the life of the playwright in its historical and aesthetic contexts, suggestions for reading the plays "under a microscope," and notes designed to bring Chekhov's world into immediate focus—everything needed to examine his drama with fresh eyes and on its own artistic terms. Three Jokes: The Bear, The Proposal, The Anniversary. The Major Plays: The Seagull, Uncle Vanya, Three Sisters, The Cherry Orchard.

  3. Notes from the Underground

    Fyodor Dostoevsky
    Translated by Constance Garnett
    Edited, with Introduction, by Charles Guignon and Kevin Aho

    Notes from the Underground

    Dostoevsky's disturbing and groundbreaking novella appears in this new annotated edition with an Introduction by Charles Guignon and Kevin Aho. An analogue of Guignon's widely praised Introduction to his 1993 edition of "The Grand Inquisitor," the editors' Introduction places the underground man in the context of European modernity, analyzes his inner dynamics in the light of the history of Russian cultural and intellectual life, and suggests compelling reasons for our own strange affinity for this nameless man who boldly declares, "I was rude and took pleasure in being so."

  4. The Cherry Orchard

    Anton Chekhov
    Translated, with an Introduction and Notes, by Sharon Marie Carnicke

    The Cherry Orchard

    "Finding a decent Cherry Orchard which is not part of an anthology is valuable. Prof. Carnicke's introduction materials are highly helpful for teaching this in a theatre history or play analysis course."
         —Erith Jaffe-Berg, Department of Theatre, University of California, Riverside

  5. The Grand Inquisitor

    Fyodor Dostoevsky
    Edited, with Introduction, by Charles Guignon
    Translated by Constance Garnett

    The Grand Inquisitor

    "This collection gives us a sense of the depth of Dostoevsky's insights into human life and suffering and of his profound understanding of the tensions and dangers of modernity. Guignon's Introduction is a brilliant study that shows how profoundly the 'legend of the Grand Inquisitor' speaks to our day."
         —Charles Taylor, McGill University

  6. Three Sisters

    Anton Chekhov
    Translated, with an Introduction and Notes, by Sharon Marie Carnicke

    Three Sisters

    "This compact book combines a lively, colloquial transition of Chekhov's late play Three Sisters with an informative and insightful introduction. Actor-focuses but broad in coverage, this edition should be required reading for any ensemble producing the play in English. It is also highly recommended for a general reader and for classroom use. Although this is not a scholarly work, it has a lot to offer scholars and Chekhov veterans."
         —Carol Apollonio, Duke University, in The Russian Review

6 Item(s)

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