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British Literature

Items 1 to 50 of 56 total

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  1. A Midsummer Night's Dream

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by John Ford
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    A Midsummer Night's Dream

    "This edition of A Midsummer Night's Dream is wonderfully lucid and thoughtful, offering supporting material that will appeal to readers from high school students to scholars. The introduction is especially thoughtful, offering, in addition to expected discussions of love, magic and imagination, an exploration of the theatrical history. The bibliography and filmography are both detailed and helpful, and the questions guide students to consider the play from many viewpoints without ever forcing an interpretation onto them."
         —Annalisa Castaldo, Widener University

  2. A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy and Continuation of the Bramine's Journal

    Laurence Sterne
    Edited, with Introduction & Notes, by Melvyn New & W. G. Day

    A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy and Continuation of the Bramine's Journal

    "Melvyn New's and W. G. Day's edition of Sterne's Sentimental Journey is the single best scholarly edition of that quirky but essential text available for student use.  The notes are meticulous and hugely informative.  The Introduction is lucid and useful, and the supplementary materials, including excerpts from Tristram Shandy and some of Sterne's sermons, provide essential background."
         —John Richetti, Department of English, University of Pennsylvania

  3. All's Well That Ends Well

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Kathleen Kalpin Smith
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    All's Well That Ends Well

    "Adding entirely new annotations to the text, providing a lucid overview of the play's production history, concluding with an instructive essay on a theatrical understanding of reading plays, and illustrated with suggestive film stills throughout, Kathleen Kalpin Smith's All's Well that Ends Well is a welcome edition to the New Kittredge Shakespeare series, richly setting the play in the context of stage and screen performance."
         —W. B. Worthen, Barnard College, Columbia University

  4. Antony and Cleopatra

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Sarah Hatchuel
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Antony and Cleopatra

    "The New Kittredge Series is both a delight and a steal. Kittredge's textual authority, updated by eminent scholars sensitive to classroom needs and alert to staging choices, is once again available in these slim, elegant, inexpensive, user-friendly volumes. With lucid notes and incisive introductions geared especially to popular film versions, the series also offers an overview of both stage and film performances of each play. A must for any Shakespeare class."
         —Laury Magnus

  5. As You Like It

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Patricia Lennox
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    As You Like It

    "Now, in the twenty-first century, Patricia Lennox broadens that understanding in her excellent edition of As You Like It where she draws on her knowledge of international film and television. She offers new meaning for modern readers who, while they savor Shakespeare’s language also understand visual signals from contemporary media."
         —Irene G. Dash, Hunter College, CUNY, retired

  6. Beowulf

    Translated, with an Introduction, by Dick Ringler

    Beowulf

    "Ringler has produced a really good translation of the poem, free of Seamus Heaney's quirks and Irishisms, keeping the rhythm and alliteration, and retaining a simplicity which demonstrates how otiose film effects are when the poem is both powerful and moving. The translation is accompanied by a marvelously straightforward introduction, eschewing all modish modern criticism and thus a useful corrective for those student-readers confused by the liberties taken by [Robert Zemeckis'] Beowulf and its writers. Tolkien would have been pleased by Ringler's version."
         —Carolyne Larrington, The Times Literary Supplement

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    Maria Edgeworth
    Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by Susan Kubica Howard

    Castle Rackrent

    Set in Ireland prior to its achieving legislative independence from Britain in 1782, Castle Rackrent tells the story of three generations of an estate-owning family as seen through the eyes—and as told in the voice—of their longtime servant, Thady Quirk, recorded and commented on by an anonymous Editor.  This edition of Maria Edgeworth’s first novel is based on the 1832 edition, the last revised by her, and includes Susan Kubica Howard’s foot-of-the-page notes on the text of the memoir as well as on the notes and glosses the Editor offers "for the information of the ignorant English reader."  Howard’s Introduction situates the novel in its political and historical context and suggests a reading of the novel as Edgeworth’s contribution to the discussion of the controversial Act of Union between Ireland and Britain that went into effect immediately after the novel’s publication in London in 1800.

  8. Coriolanus

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Jeffrey Kahan
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Coriolanus

    "Professor Jeffrey Kahan's expertise in the history of Shakespearean acting complements Kittredge's lucid [introduction and text] to create an edition of Coriolanus that centers modern readers in the play’s performance. Kahan's introduction to the edition both recounts historical performances and carefully details recent directorial choices—choices that reappear in the course of his footnotes providing acting choices for key scenes. These notes, together with photographs of compelling performances, fix the reader's imagination firmly in the midst of Shakespeare’s chilling theatrical portrayal of Republican Rome. This highly accessible edition will prove invaluable for actors, students, and lovers of Shakespeare."
         —Cyndia Clegg, Pepperdine University

  9. Cymbeline

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Hannah C. Wojciehowski
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Cymbeline

    "The New Kittredge series is both a delight and a steal. Kittredge's textual authority, updated by eminent scholars sensitive to classroom needs and alert to staging choices, is once again available in these slim, elegant, inexpensive, user-friendly volumes. With lucid notes and incisive introductions geared especially to popular film versions, the series also offers an overview of both stage and film performances of each play. A must for any Shakespeare class."
         —Laury Magnus, Contributing Editor, New Kittredge Shakespeare and Hamletworks.org

  10. Doctor Faustus (Lake & Ribner Edition)

    Christopher Marlowe
    Edited by James H. Lake and Irving Ribner

    Doctor Faustus (Lake & Ribner Edition)

    An annotated version of Doctor Faustus, with modernized spelling and punctuation, of the 1616 B-text. James H. Lake's Introduction discusses the play’s historical and dramatic contexts, but focuses on its performance history from the Elizabethan era to our own, including film productions. Textual notes discuss variations between the A and B texts. Interviews with Ralph Alan Cohen of Shenandoah Shakespeare and Andreas Teuber (Mephistopheles in the Richard Burton production) as well as illustrations from theatre and film performances included.

  11. Doctor Faustus: With The English Faust Book

    Christopher Marlowe
    Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by David Wootton

    Doctor Faustus: With The English Faust Book

    "This is an excellent edition; I really appreciate the clear Introduction and the exceptionally useful notes.  I look forward to using this text with a freshman literature class who will really benefit from the helpful textual apparatus."
         —Charlotte England, Department of English, Salisbury University

  12. Edward II

    Christopher Marlowe
    Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by Stephen J. Lynch

    Edward II

    "This exciting new edition of Edward II is indeed reader friendly. Of particular distinction are the introductory sections which include a thorough account of Marlowe's biography, a fresh critical examination of the play, plus a bibliography for further reading; a wise consideration of the date and text; and extensive annotations, especially helpful to students who have difficulties with the language. Of special value to both students and scholars are the Related Texts that follow the text of the play: three sections of documentary evidence on historical sources; power and politics; and love, friendship, and homoeroticism—all vital to an understanding of the play. No previous edition of the play manages to encompass so much."
         —Robert A. Logan, University of Hartford

  13. Hamlet

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Bernice W. Kliman and James H. Lake
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Hamlet

    "Shakespeare scholars Bernice W. Kliman and James H. Lake have carried out the important task of not only bringing up to date the text of Hamlet as edited in the last century by the celebrated Shakespearean George Lyman Kittredge but also retaining its significant features. The editors' discerning analyses of performances by Mel Gibson, Kenneth Branah, Michael Almereyda, and Simon Russell Beale drive home the point that Hamlet today remains alive but restless and unpredictable. It exemplifies Ben Johnson's Shakespeare, who '. . . was not of an age, but for all time!'"
         —Kenneth Sprague Rothwell, (1921-2010), was Professor Emeritus, University of Vermont

  14. King Henry the Sixth: Parts I, II, and III

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Annalisa Castaldo
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    King Henry the Sixth: Parts I, II, and III

    George Lyman Kittredge's insightful editions of Shakespeare have endured in part because of his eclecticism, his diversity of interests, and his wide-ranging accomplishments—all of which are reflected in the valuable notes in each volume. The plays in the New Kittredge Shakespeare series retain the original Kittredge notes and introductions, changed or augmented only when some modernization seems necessary. These new editions also include introductory essays by contemporary editors, notes on the plays as they have been performed on stage and film, and additional student materials.

  15. King John & Henry VIII

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by James H. Lake, Courtney Lehmann, and Jane Wells
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    King John & Henry VIII

    "This is a terrific edition that really brings King John and Henry VIII to life. Consistently inviting student participation, the edition makes the plays wonderfully accessible, through explanations of the language, descriptions of context, topic guides, plot outlines, illustrations, and genealogies. A particular strength is the emphasis on performance. Thanks to the insightful histories provided, King John and Henry VIII are richly illuminated as stage and screen creations, allowing for genuinely imaginative engagement with these most fascinating Shakespearean dramas."
         —Ramona Wray, Reader in English at Queen's University, Belfast

  16. King Lear

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Kenneth S. Rothwell
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    King Lear

    "By adding comments on recorded performances to Kittredge's notes . . . [which] were fun and helpful to my early study of Shakespeare . . . Kenneth Sprague Rothwell gives students and researchers the means to explore how performance can elucidate 'the script' of King Lear."
         —Harry Keyishian, Fairleigh Dickinson University

  17. King Richard II

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Thomas A. Pendleton
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    King Richard II

    "An extraordinary artistic achievement, Richard II remains one of Shakespeare's most satisfyingly ambiguous plays and expertly-penned exercises in shifting audience sympathies. Pendleton's even-handed introduction and judicious supplements to Kittredge's annotations lay out the play's issues in a way that make its delightful poignancy even more available to readers. Especially useful are Pendleton’s extensive in-text performance notes, which recount how film versions deal with the challenges and possibilities the play presents."
         —James Wells, Muskingum University

  18. King Richard the Third

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Jacquelyn Kilpatrick
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    King Richard the Third

    "In this splendid edition, Jacquelyn Kilpatrick gives us a comprehensive primer on Shakespeare's performance craft and an ideal text for teaching Richard III, particularly to students new to Shakespeare. Her introductory materials make a century of scholarship and filmmaking both accessible to the newcomer and illuminating for the experienced student or performer. Her keen understanding of the original performance circumstances of Shakespeare's plays and insightful accounts of salient stage and film productions work together to open up the rich array of possibilities and choices in performance, both then and now."
         —Catherine S. Burriss, California State University, Channel Islands

  19. Le Morte D'Arthur

    Sir Thomas Malory
    Condensed and modernized, with an Introduction, by Joseph Glaser

    Le Morte D'Arthur

    "I've just finished reading Joseph Glaser's Le Morte D'Arthur. I'm very pleased with it: the introduction is helpful without becoming an extended essay, the suggested reading seems solid and diverse, and the index is VERY useful, even for someone who has read Malory before. At last, a reader can keep all the knights and ladies straight! A fine entry point to a grand text, and when I next have an occasion to teach a course involving chivalry, I'll plan to use this very affordable edition."  
          —Craig Caldwell, Department of History, Appalachian State University

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    Sir Thomas Malory
    Edited, with an Introduction and Commentary, by P. J. C. Field

    Le Morte Darthur: The Seventh & Eighth Tales

     "P. J. C. Field, the world's preeminent Malory specialist, has wisely chosen to offer here Malory's seventh and eighth tales, recounting the decline and end of Camelot.  The authoritative text is accompanied by indispensable notes and preceded by a remarkably thorough and learned—but never obscure—Introduction sufficient to prepare students and other readers to profit fully from the texts. This book is ideal for those coming to Malory for the first time and a distinct pleasure for those who already know him well."
         —Norris J. Lacy, E. E. Sparks Professor of French and Medieval Studies, Penn State University

  21. Love's Labour's Lost

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Jill P. Ingram
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Love's Labour's Lost

    "This student-friendly edition of a difficult play includes a clear, helpful introduction and notes elucidating the complicated imagery and wordplay. Notes and illustrations refer the reader to various staging options enabling him or her to imagine Love’s Labour’s Lost in performance."
         —Katharine E. Maus, James Branch Cabell Professor of English Literature, University of Virginia

  22. Macbeth

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Annalisa Castaldo
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Macbeth

    "Seventy years after their publication, George Lyman Kittredge's editions of Shakespeare remain exceptional for the combination of learning, acuity, wit, and clarity he brings to his notes on the plays. Annalisa Castaldo makes Kittredge's Macbeth even more useful for modern readers by skillfully streamlining Kittredge's annotations and adding helpful analyses of the play and its film productions. There is no better edition of Shakespeare for students, beginning or advanced."
         —Dr. James Wells

  23. Measure for Measure

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Bernice W. Kliman and Laury Magnus
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Measure for Measure

    "This most problematic of Shakespeare's plays, a comedy filled with dark corners, has been beautifully presented by Laury Magnus and the late Bernice Kliman. Scholars will admire their editorial skill while students will benefit greatly from their ample notes, useful timeline of the play's plot, and cogent performance history. As the editors explain, the fiercely interlocked themes of the play—sex, money, justice, and religion—make this play a measure not only of Shakespeare's time but of our own."
         —Anthony DiMatteo, New York Institute of Technology

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    Edited by David Bevington

    Medieval Drama

    This reprint (with updated 'Suggestions for Further Reading') of the Houghton Mifflin edition makes David Bevington's classic anthology of medieval drama available again at an affordable price.

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    Translated and Edited by Joseph Glaser

    Middle English Poetry in Modern Verse

    This rich and lively anthology offers a broad selection of Middle English poetry from about 1200 to 1500 C.E., including more than 150 secular and religious lyrics and nine complete or extracted longer works, all translated into Modern English verse that closely resembles the original forms.  Five complete satires and narratives illustrate important conventions of the period: Athelston, a historical romance; The Cock and the Fox, a beast fable by Robert Henryson; Sir Orfeo, a Breton lai; Saint Erkenwald, an alliterative saint's life; and The Land of Cockayne, a fantasy. The book concludes with substantial excerpts from longer narratives such as Piers Plowman and Confessio Amantis.

  26. Much Ado About Nothing

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Peter Kanelos
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Much Ado About Nothing

    "Kittredge's admirably full notes, supplemented by Peter Kanelos's user-friendly introduction and references to film and television versions of the play, add up to a very accessible edition. I particularly liked the discussion of 'How to read Much Ado as performance,' which opens up a lot of possibilities for the student and teacher."
         —Lois Potter, Ned B. Allen Professor Emeritus, University of Delaware

  27. Othello, The Moor of Venice

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Gretchen Schulz
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Othello, The Moor of Venice

    "This is an edition of Othello whose conversational introduction and unobtrusive but thorough notes will make the first-time visitor to the text an expert on the play. By keeping her own focus on the issue of performanceincluding her nuanced descriptions of the major filmseditor Gretchen Schulz not only helps readers see Othello in the theatre of the imagination, she helps them to direct it as well."
         —Ralph Alan Cohen, American Shakespeare Center, Co-founder and Director of Mission; Gonder Professor of Shakespeare, Mary Baldwin College

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    John Milton
    Edited by Merritt Y. Hughes

    Paradise Lost (Hughes Edition)

    “Wonderful! Hughes’ edition is unexcelled!”
         —Carol V. Kaske, Cornell University

  29. Paradise Lost (Kastan Edition)

    John Milton
    Edited, with Introduction, by David Scott Kastan

    Paradise Lost (Kastan Edition)

    "Kastan is an exemplary editor, attuned to emerging critical currents, yet steeped in the scholarship of an earlier tradition, aware of the text's provenance and reception, alert to its topicality.  His introduction, a model of theoretically informed, politically committed, historically grounded criticism, makes this edition of Paradise Lost all you would expect from one of the most erudite and perceptive figures in the field."
         —Willy Maley, Modern Language Review

  30. Pericles, Prince of Tyre

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Jeffrey Kahan
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Pericles, Prince of Tyre

    "Kahan has presented the performance and printing issues with directness and clarity, leaving many technical details that might discourage some students to the footnotes. The result is a very readable "Introduction" to one of Shakespeare's late romances."
         —Stanley Stewart, Distinguished Professor of English, University of California, Riverside

  31. Romeo and Juliet

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Bernice W. Kliman and Laury Magnus
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    Romeo and Juliet

    "This splendid edition furnishes readers, students, and theater people alike with a marvelous set of tools for appreciating the many facets of Shakespeare's play: a freshly edited text from the authoritative 1599 quarto, trenchant explanatory notes, and–best of all–insightful performance notes detailing the various ways in which individual passages have been interpreted in important films and stage productions."
         —Eric Rasmussen, University of Nevada, Reno and co-editor of the RSC Shakespeare edition

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    Translated, with notes, by Joseph Glaser
    Introduction by Christine Chism

    Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

    “A dazzling recreation of the most memorable Middle English poem, and one that captures the original alliterative verse in all its dimensions: sense, sound, and rhythm.”
          —Ad Putter, Professor of Medieval English Literature, University of Bristol

  33. The Canterbury Tales in Modern Verse

    Geoffrey Chaucer
    Translated and Edited, with Introduction, by Joseph Glaser

    The Canterbury Tales in Modern Verse

    "This version of The Canterbury Tales is indeed 'fast-paced and entertaining'.  It includes translations of most of the tales (certainly all of the most popular ones) and abridgments and summaries of a few others.  Glaser's main innovation in this translation is a rather striking decision to render Chaucer's standard iambic pentameter line in iambic tetrameter. . . . Those who read his translation of The Canterbury Tales will likely be motivated to tackle a linguistically more challenging, yet more rewarding Middle English edition.  Those who lack the time for such a task will still be able to appreciate the humor and variety of one of Chaucer's greatest works and will, through the basic and clear Introduction, get a sense of the historical and literary background of Chaucer, his times, and his works.  The near conversational tone of the Introduction, furthermore, makes for an unintimidating encounter with a period of literature that, for many, is foreign and remote.  As a kind of gateway text, therefore, Glaser's new translation of The Canterbury Tales will be much appreciated and valued by a non-specialist audience."
         —Jennifer A. Smith, Comitatus

  34. The Comedy of Errors

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Laury Magnus
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    The Comedy of Errors

    "Laury Magnus's edition of The Comedy of Errors is a treasure—it gives us all the footnotes Kittredge never himself wrote along with a superb collection of production photographs of a wide variety of performances and extended production notes. The introduction is comprehensive in establishing the various ideas and dimensions of a play mistakenly thought to be the simple Roman farce of a young playwright. And teachers will find the extended list of assignments as suggestively fruitful as students reading the play for the first time. This combination is a real winner."
         —Arthur F. Kinney, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

  35. The Complete Poems and Major Prose

    John Milton
    Edited by Merritt Y. Hughes

    The Complete Poems and Major Prose

    “This is by far the most thorough, most inspired and inspiring gathering of Milton's thought in one volume. It is a boon to teachers and students of Milton. Your keeping it in print is commendable and appreciated.”
         —Cicero Bruce, Dalton State College

  36. The Faerie Queene, Book Five

    Edmund Spenser
    Edited, with Introduction, by Abraham Stoll
    Series General Editor: Abraham Stoll

    The Faerie Queene, Book Five

    "This edition of book 5 of The Faerie Queene is a welcome contribution. Stoll presents a text that will be very useful in the classroom. The decision to make available individual (or in two cases, paired) books of the romance will make it possible for instructors to teach their preferred books of the romance; Stoll's edition of book 5 will certainly increase the likelihood that the Legend of Justice will reappear in undergraduate classrooms, introducing students to a text in which Spenser scholars are increasingly interested.  We will all benefit from that."
         —Andrew Fleck, Sixteenth Century Journal

  37. The Faerie Queene, Book One

    Edmund Spenser
    Edited, with Introduction, by Carol Kaske
    Series General Editor: Abraham Stoll

    The Faerie Queene, Book One

    Framed in Spenser's distinctive, opulent stanza and in some of the trappings of epic, Book One of Spenser's The Faerie Queene consists of a chivalric romance that has been made to a typical recipe—"fierce warres and faithfull loves"—but that has been Christianized in both overt and subtle ways. The physical and moral wanderings of the Redcrosse Knight dramatize his effort to find the proper proportion of human to divine contributions to salvation—a key issue between Protestants and Catholics. Fantastic elements like alien humans, humanoids, and monsters and their respective dwelling places are vividly described.

  38. The Faerie Queene, Book Six and the Mutabilitie Cantos

    Edmund Spenser
    Edited by Andrew Hadfield and Abraham Stoll
    Introduction by Andrew Hadfield
    Series General Editor: Abraham Stoll

    The Faerie Queene, Book Six and the Mutabilitie Cantos

    Book Six and the incomplete Book Seven of The Faerie Queene are the last sections of the unfinished poem to have been published.  They show Spenser inflecting his narrative with an ever more personal note, and becoming an ever more desperate and anxious author, worried that things were falling apart as Queen Elizabeth failed in health and the Irish crisis became ever more terrifying.  The moral confusion and uncertainty that Calidore, the Knight of Courtesy, has to confront are symptomatic of the lack of control that Spenser saw everywhere around him.  Yet, within such a troubling and disturbing work there are moments of great beauty and harmony, such as the famous dance of the Graces that Colin Clout, the rustic alter ego of the poet himself, conjures up with his pipe.  Book Seven, the "Two Cantos of Mutabilitie," is among the finest of Spenser's poetic works, in which he explains the mythical origins of his world, as the gods debate on the hill opposite his Irish house.  Whether order or chaos triumphs in the end has been the subject of most subsequent critical debate.

  39. The Faerie Queene, Book Two

    Edmund Spenser
    Edited, with Introduction, by Erik Gray
    Series General Editor: Abraham Stoll

    The Faerie Queene, Book Two

    "Teachers of Spenser will also welcome two more installments of the Hackett editions of separate books of The Faerie Queene under the general editorship of Abraham Stoll, this time on books 2 and on books 3 and 4.  In my view, these are the most attractive, inexpensive, but also comprehensive editions to date, with far better (and easy to read) notes on mythology and name symbolism (matters increasingly foreign to our undergraduates) than almost all previous versions."
         —Catherine Gimelli Martin, Studies in English Literature 1500-1900

  40. The Faerie Queene, Books Three and Four

    Edmund Spenser
    Edited, with Introduction, by Dorothy Stephens
    Series General Editor: Abraham Stoll

    The Faerie Queene, Books Three and Four

    "Stephens's introduction to books 3 and 4 [offers] a guide to approaching the poem's grammar and syntax, meter, and significant theme's as well as a list of possible questions for discussion based on issues addressed in recent criticism. . . . Stephens addresses the nature and content of Spenser's poem from a modern perspective backward, rather than from a medieval or early modern perspective forward—an orientation that may be more comfortable for less sophisticated readership and which helps to ground The Faerie Queene in a broader literary tradition."
         —Rachel E. Frier, Sixteenth Century Journal

  41. The Faerie Queene: Complete in Five Volumes
  42. The First Part of King Henry the Fourth

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Samuel Crowl
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    The First Part of King Henry the Fourth

    "Samuel Crowl's revision and updating of George Lyman Kittredge's edition of I Henry IV makes this useful text even more attractive to a contemporary audience of both general readers and students. Drawing on his extensive knowledge of and sensitivity to Shakespearean performance, Crowl provides a new Introduction,in addition to Kittredge's original, highlighting performance history, together with an essay on "How to Read The First Part of King Henry the Fourth as Performance," which pays particular attention to Orson Welles' Chimes at Midnight and two television productions of the play available on DVD. Crowl has lightly revised and extended Kittredge's annotations, and has added extensive performance notes where appropriate."
         —Michael Anderegg, University of North Dakota

  43. The First Part of King Henry the Sixth

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Michèle Willems
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    The First Part of King Henry the Sixth

    "Michèle Willems's edition of The First Part of King Henry the Sixth offers valuable insights into this little-known and puzzling play. Like G. L. Kittredge, on whose work this edition is based, she sees it as mainly Shakespearean. The play we are shown here is no simple exaltation of patriotic feeling, but, more tellingly, a somber and incisive account of a kingdom staggering under the effects of the death of Chivalry. Willems astutely sees an interaction of the play's two main plots that are centered around Lord Talbot and Joan of Arc. She rightly underscores the overwhelming presence in the play of ambivalence, contradiction, irony, and multiple angles of vision. Her account of the play in performance tells a similarly disillusioning story in theatrical terms. Illustrations from performance history help bring to life this underrated and fascinating historical saga."
         —David Bevington, University of Chicago

  44. The Jew of Malta

    Christopher Marlowe
    Edited, with Introduction, by Stephen J. Lynch

    The Jew of Malta

    "A provocative edition, one which belongs on the shelves of student and scholar alike."
         —Martha Oberle, Frederick Community College, Maryland, in The Sixteenth Century Journal

  45. The Life of Henry V

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Annalisa Castaldo
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    The Life of Henry V

    "The New Kittredge Series is both a delight and a steal. Kittredge's textual authority, updated by eminent scholars sensitive to classroom needs and alert to staging choices, is once again available in these slim, elegant, inexpensive, user-friendly volumes. With lucid notes and incisive introductions geared especially to popular film versions, the series also offers an overview of both stage and film performances of each play. A must for any Shakespeare class."
         —Dr. Laury Magnus

  46. The Merchant of Venice

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Kenneth S. Rothwell
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    The Merchant of Venice

    "Ken Rothwell does a splendid updating of Kittredge's Merchant of Venice with considerations of the play in performance. His essay on the play's stage history is lucid, his additions to Kittredge's notes are indicative of performance choices, and, as one would expect of the preeminent scholar of Shakespeare on film, his discussion of cinematic adaptations of Merchant is richly informative. This edition should prove useful to all levels of undergraduates."
         —James Bulman, Allegheny College

  47. The Merry Wives of Windsor

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Jane W. Wells
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    The Merry Wives of Windsor

    George Lyman Kittredge's insightful editions of Shakespeare have endured in part because of his eclecticism, his diversity of interests, and his wide-ranging accomplishments—all of which are reflected in the valuable notes in each volume. The plays in the New Kittredge Shakespeare series retain the original Kittredge notes and introductions, changed or augmented only when some modernization seems necessary. These new editions also include introductory essays by contemporary editors, notes on the plays as they have been performed on stage and film, and additional student materials.

  48. The Second Part of King Henry the Fourth

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by James Wells
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    The Second Part of King Henry the Fourth

    "This is an exciting new edition, with a clear and lively introduction that succinctly captures the play's complexity and challenges. Wells' discussion of the play's relationship with Henry IV, Part One is especially thoughtful, and his attention to performance and film history is extremely valuable. The thorough and clear notes will be extremely helpful to students navigating Shakespeare's language for the first time, as well as for deepening the understanding of those who have some familiarity already. All in all, this is a valuable treatment of an often difficult play."
         —Tanya Pollard, Brooklyn College, CUNY

  49. The Taming of the Shrew

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Laury Magnus
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    The Taming of the Shrew

    "Laury Magnus' edition of The Taming of the Shrew is much more than a revision of Kittredge. Her splendid introduction and appendices are sensitive to the play’s language and its paradoxical nuances of gender, and she understands that the play is, after all, a love story. Her explanatory notes are excellent, but most impressive and original is her emphasis on film, theater, and television performance."
         —Maurice Charney, Emeritus, Rutgers University

  50. The Two Gentlemen of Verona

    William Shakespeare
    Edited by Matthew Kozusko
    Series Editor James H. Lake

    The Two Gentlemen of Verona

    "Even as the New Kittredge Shakespeare series glances back to George Lyman Kittredge's student editions of the plays, it is very much of our current moment: the slim editions are targeted largely at high school and first-year college students who are more versed in visual than in print culture. Not only are the texts of the plays accompanied by photographs or stills from various stage and cinema performances: the editorial contributions are performance-oriented, offering surveys of contemporary film interpretations, essays on the plays as performance pieces, and an annotated filmography. Traditional editorial issues (competing versions of the text, cruxes, editorial emendation history) are for the most part excluded; the editions focus instead on clarifying the text with an eye to performing it. There is no disputing the pedagogic usefulness of the New Kittredge Shakespeare's performance-oriented approach."
         —Studies in English Literature, Tudor and Stuart Drama

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