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History

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  1. A Debate on Jewish Emancipation and Christian Theology in Old Berlin

    David Friedländer, Friedrich Schleiermacher, Wilhelm Abraham Teller
    Edited and Translated by Richard Crouter and Julie Klassen

    A Debate on Jewish Emancipation and Christian Theology in Old Berlin

    "One of the most fascinating and, indeed, seminal debates in the protracted struggle of German Jewry to gain full citizenship and civic equality. As the translators make clear in their learned and generally lucid Introduction, this debate illuminates the enduring difficulty of modern nation states to establish a civic society that is, if not religiously neutral, at least inclusive. . . . It will surely enter the canon of standard works in the study of modern Jewish history."
         —Paul Mendes-Flohr, Hebrew University

  2. A Disquisition On Government and Selections from The Discourse

    John Calhoun
    Edited, with Introduction, by C. Gordon Post
    New Foreword by Shannon C. Stimson

    A Disquisition On Government and Selections from The Discourse

    The only student edition of Calhoun’s writings available, this volume offers the Disquisition in its entirety along with two key selections from the Discourse: “Formation of the Federal Period” and “A Plural Executive Proposed.”

  3. A History of Philosophy In America, Set of 2 Volumes

    E. Flower & M. G. Murphey

    A History of Philosophy In America, Set of 2 Volumes

    The two volumes that comprise this set may also be purchased separately: please see their individual listings. Volume I: 480 pages. From the Puritans through Transcendentalism. Volume II: 544 pages. From the St. Louis Hegelians through C. I. Lewis and G. H. Mead.

  4. A History of Philosophy In America, Vol. 1 of 2

    E. Flower & M. G. Murphey

    A History of Philosophy In America, Vol. 1 of 2

    This volume is part one of a two-volume set. It may be purchased separately or in conjunction with volume two. Volume 1: From the Puritans through Transcendentalism.

  5. A History of Philosophy In America, Vol. 2 of 2

    E. Flower & M. G. Murphey

    A History of Philosophy In America, Vol. 2 of 2

    This volume is part two of a two-volume set. It may be purchased separately or in conjunction with volume one. Vol. II: From the St. Louis Hegelians through C. I. Lewis. and G. H. Mead.

  6. A Letter Concerning Toleration

    John Locke
    Edited by James H. Tully

    A Letter Concerning Toleration

    John Locke's subtle and influential defense of religious toleration as argued in his seminal Letter Concerning Toleration (1685) appears in this edition as introduced by one of our most distinguished political theorists and historians of political thought.

  7. A Pioneer in Yokohama

    C.T. Assendelft de Coningh
    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Martha Chaiklin

    A Pioneer in Yokohama

    "A great read—I couldn’t put it down! A Pioneer in Yokohama truly brings the earliest months of the Japanese treaty port to life. From the brief Japanese 'Gold Rush' to duels and terrorist attacks, from the perils of international commerce to hilarious problems of translation and miscommunication, Dutchman De Coningh’s memoir provides vivid insights into both nineteenth-century trade and Yokohama’s international community. Moreover, the extraordinary sleuth work done by translator Chaiklin to identify even the most preposterous-seeming events and characters adds the spice of historical confirmation to the drama. . . . A great resource for researchers, classrooms, and casual readers alike."
         —Sarah Thal, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  8. A Tale of Two Melons

    Sarah Schneewind

    A Tale of Two Melons

    "Undergraduates will join specialists in enjoying this feast of melons. Schneewind's marvelous little book is at once a primer in some key aspects of China's traditional civilization and history, as well as a case study of an obscurely understood event that took place in 1372, in the reign of Taizu, founder of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). When two melons share a single stalk, and a local grower presents the anomaly to the emperor, the symbolism, the intentions of the giver, the reaction of the recipient, and the meaning of the whole act to observers and later commentators turn out to be anything but straightforward. Divergent interpretations began immediately, and continue to the present day."
         —John Dardess,  University of Kansas

  9. A True and Exact History of the Island of Barbados

    Richard Ligon
    Edited, with an Introduction, by Karen Ordahl Kupperman

    A True and Exact History of the Island of Barbados

    “Ligon’s True and Exact History of the Island of Barbados is the most significant book-length English text written about the Caribbean in the seventeenth century. [It] allows one to see the contested process behind the making of the Caribbean sugar/African slavery complex. Kupperman is one of the leading scholars of the early modern Atlantic world. . . . I cannot think of any scholar better prepared to write an Introduction that places Ligon, his text, and Barbados in an Atlantic historical context. The Introduction is quite thorough, readable, and accurate; the notes [are] exemplary!”
         —Susan Parrish, University of Michigan

  10. Vindication_PNG

    Mary Wollstonecraft
    Edited, with an Introduction and Notes, by Philip Barnard and Stephen Shapiro

    A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

    "A thoughtful and useful abridgement of an essential historical, political, and philosophical text. [Barnard and Shapiro] have managed to preserve the tone and arguments of the original while shedding much of the redundancy and lengthy quotations of external sources that can be off-putting and cumbersome for today's readers. The explanatory footnotes added to the text are helpful without being overbearing."
         —Katrin Schultheiss, George Washington University

  11. Addresses to the German Nation

    Johann Gottlieb Fichte
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Isaac Nakhimovsky, Béla Kapossy, and Keith Tribe

    Addresses to the German Nation

    This new edition of the Addresses is designed to make Fichte’s arguments more accessible to English-speaking readers. The clear, readable, and reliable translation is accompanied by a chronology of the events surrounding Fichte’s life, suggestions for further reading, and an index. The groundbreaking introductory essay situates Fichte’s theory of the nation state in the history of modern political thought. It provides historians, political theorists, and other students of nationalism with a fresh perspective for considering the interface between cosmopolitanism and republicanism, patriotism and nationalism.

  12. Aeneid

    Virgil
    Translated by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction by W. R. Johnson

    Aeneid

    "Crisp, idiomatic, and precise, this is a translation for our era. The list of further reading, grounded in the writings of W.R. Johnson (who also wrote the Introduction) and Michael C. J. Putnam, suggests the context that informs the translation: here, as the translator says in the Preface, you will find an Aeneid that works more in the shadows than in the light. . . . This translation would be excellent for classroom use: not only would it incite fascinating discussions about issues of war and empire, but it also reads well aloud. . . . Together with Johnson's Introduction, this volume offers the Aeneid in terms that will resonate strongly with the general reader of today."
         —Sarah Spence, New England Classical Journal

  13. Afro-Latino Voices

    Edited by Kathryn Joy McKnight & Leo J. Garofalo

    Afro-Latino Voices

    "A groundbreaking book . . . provides a broad and rich sampling of documents recording the early modern voices of the African diaspora. . . . Wills, testaments, letters, and historical chronicles are some of the sources that scholars from various disciplines present in this anthology. . . . Each scholar provides a meticulous contextualization of the historical, social, cultural, and political circumstances surrounding the production of each document. The trilingual presentation allows the reader to see the rhetorical style of archival documents in the original language. Additionally, the maps ensure that students have a clear understanding of the geography and historical sites relevant to the range of texts included in the book."
         —Margaret Olsen, Macalester College

  14. Afro-Latino Voices, Shorter Edition

    Edited by Kathryn Joy McKnight & Leo J. Garofalo

    Afro-Latino Voices, Shorter Edition

    Ideally suited for use in broad, swift-moving surveys of Latin American and Caribbean history, this abridgment of McKnight and Garofalo's Afro-Latino Voices: Narratives from the Early Modern Ibero-Atlantic World, 1550-1812 (2009) includes all of the English translations, introductions, and annotation created for that volume.

  15. Agricola, Germany, and Dialogue on Orators

    Tacitus
    Translated, with Introduction, by Herbert W. Benario

    Agricola, Germany, and Dialogue on Orators

    This volume provides three short works of Tacitus: Agricola—the fullest ancient account of Rome's conquest of Britain and of the public career of a senator in the service of a Roman emperor—Germany, a valuable source on the ancient land and its people, and Dialogue on Orators, an examination in the tradition of Cicero's rhetorical essays of the decline of oratory in Rome's early empire. Together, these works illuminate an important phase in Tacitus' development as Rome's foremost historian.

  16. Alexander The Great

    Arrian, Diodorus, Plutarch, and Quintus Curtius
    Edited, with Introduction, by James Romm; Translated by Pamela Mensch and James Romm

    Alexander The Great

    Comprising relevant selections from the four ancient writers whose portraits of Alexander the Great still survive—Arrian, Diodorus, Plutarch, and Quintus Curtius—this volume provides a complete narrative of the important events in Alexander's life. The Introduction sets these works in historical context, stretching from the conclusion of the Peloponnesian War through Alexander's conquest of Asia, and provides an assessment of Alexander's historical importance as well as a survey of the central controversies surrounding his personality, aims and intentions. This edition includes a timeline, maps, a bibliography, a glossary, and an index.

  17. An Account, Much Abbreviated, of the Destruction of the Indies

    Bartolomé De Las Casas
    Edited, with Introduction, by Franklin W. Knight,
    Translated by Andrew Hurley

    An Account, Much Abbreviated, of the Destruction of the Indies

    “This is a splendid new translation of Brevísima Relación, the famous denunciation of the Spanish conquest of the Americas, written by Dominican friar Bartolomé de Las Casas (1483-1566). . . . The Hackett edition of Brevísima Relación . . . has a lot to offer to undergraduates. . . . Knight’s introduction to the text makes in fact for a compelling read. . . . Together with Knight’s ample annotations, which refer students to the most up-to-date secondary literature, it makes for a wonderful introduction to the history of Europe’s expansion into the Western Hemisphere.”
         —Martine van Ittersum, Journal of Early Modern History

  18. Ancient Rome

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Christopher Francese and R. Scott Smith

    Ancient Rome

    "Terrific . . . exactly the sort of collection we have long needed: one offering a wide range of texts, both literary and documentary, and that—with the inclusion of Sulpicia and Perpetua—allows students to hear the voices of actual women from the ancient world. The translations themselves are fluid; the inclusion of long extracts allows students to sink their teeth into material in ways not possible with traditional source books. The anonymous texts, inscriptions, and other non-literary material topically arranged in the 'Documentary' section will enable students to see how the documentary evidence supplements or undermines the views advanced in the literary texts. This is a book that should be of great use to anyone teaching a survey of the history of Ancient Rome or a Roman Civilization course. I look forward to teaching with this book which is, I think, the best source book I have seen for the way we teach these days."
         —David Potter, University of Michigan

  19. Annals

    Tacitus
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by A. J. Woodman

    Annals

    "An elegant addition to Tacitean scholarship. . . . The appendices are comprehensive and extremely useful for students, covering political and military terms that are cross-referenced to the text, the deployment of the army which can be confusing in the Annals, Rome, geographical and tribal names, and maps as well as a good index of names. . . . This translation has many eminently practical features, including clear layout, the use of footnotes, and numbering of the text. . . . The Introduction is very accessible and, coupled with the text, will be very useful for students." 
        —Alisdair Gibson, Journal of Classics Teaching

  20. PNG

    Johann Gottfried Herder
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Ioannis D. Evrigenis and Daniel Pellerin

    Another Philosophy of History and Selected Political Writings

    "Evrigenis and Pellerin should be congratulated for editing this volume, which publishes Herder's smaller and early work, Another Philosophy of History, including six smaller essays on the same topic. This volume offers the opportunity to introduce Herder to students in a survey of the history of political thought, along with his better-known contemporaries such as Rousseau, Kant, Burke, and Hegel, as well as their predecessors Machiavelli, Locke, and Hobbes. Evrigenis and Pellerin's edition gives the reader a fine introduction to Herder and his thought. The selections of the smaller essays are very helpful in allowing someone unfamiliar with Herder to see how his important thoughts could be responsible in shaping how thinkers in the later half of the 19th Century thought about the nation and the role of politics in general. Rating: * * * * *"
         —Clifford Angell Bates, Jr., Political Studies Review

  21. Arthur Mervyn; or, Memoirs of the Year 1793

    Charles Brockden Brown
    Edited, with an Introduction, by Philip Barnard & Stephen Shapiro

    Arthur Mervyn; or, Memoirs of the Year 1793

    "This new edition of Arthur Mervyn far exceeds any previous version of this remarkable American novel.  Through exhaustive archival research, the editors have produced a reliable text constructed within the intellectual, cultural, political, and religious contexts of a society informing Brown's efforts to capture and preserve the formation of the early republic for generations of readers and cultural historians.  This vital text is essential reading for anyone interested in the origins of the United States."
         —Emory Elliott, University Professor, University of California-Riverside

  22. Augsburg During the Reformation Era

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by B. Ann Tlusty

    Augsburg During the Reformation Era

    "Sixteenth-century Augsburg comes to life in this beautifully chosen and elegantly translated selection of original documents. Ranging across the whole panoply of social activity from the legislative reformation to work, recreation, and family life, these extracts make plain the subtle system of checks and balances, violence, and self-regulation that brought order and vibrancy to a sophisticated city community. Most of all we hear sixteenth-century people speak: in their petitions and complaints, their nervous responses under interrogation, their rage and laughter. Tlusty has done an invaluable service in crafting a collection that should be an indispensable part of the teaching syllabus."
         —Andrew Pettegree, University of St. Andrews

  23. Augustine: Political Writings

    Augustine
    Translated by Michael W. Tkacz and Douglas Kries
    Introduction by Ernest L. Fortin

    Augustine: Political Writings

    "[This volume] offers one-stop access to the political ideas of a major pre-modern thinker. The translations are fresh, accurate, supple, and clear, and the notes and comments are helpful. Ernest Fortin's excellent Introduction sets the central text, the City of God, in historical perspective and outlines problems Augustine faced in trying to reconcile Christian faith with the legitimate demands of civic life."
         —Alan R. Perreiah, Teaching Philosophy

  24. Bacon: Selected Philosophical Works

    Francis Bacon
    Edited, with Introduction, by Rose-Mary Sargent

    Bacon: Selected Philosophical Works

    “It is a great service to teaching at both the graduate and undergraduate level to have such a fine collection of Bacon’s texts available with an introduction by Rose-Mary Sargent. This is the kind of “essential Bacon” we need for teaching purposes. I was particularly pleased to see the “Natural Histories” and New Atlantis included.”
        —Phillip R. Sloan, University of Notre Dame

  25. Before and after Hegel

    Tom Rockmore

    Before and after Hegel

    “A good elementary introduction to the study of Hegel and his influence. . . . It places Hegel’s work in the intellectual context of his time very well.”
         —H. S. Harris, Glendon College, York University

  26. Beyond Freedom and Dignity

    B. F. Skinner

    Beyond Freedom and Dignity

    In this profound and profoundly controversial work, a landmark of 20th-century thought originally published in 1971, B. F. Skinner makes his definitive statement about humankind and society. Beyond Freedom and Dignity urges us to reexamine the ideals we have taken for granted and to consider the possibility of a radically behaviorist approach to human problems—one that has appeared to some incompatible with those ideals, but which envisions the building of a world in which humankind can attain its greatest possible achievements.

  27. Bing: From Farmer's Son to Magistrate in Han China

    Michael Loewe

    Bing: From Farmer's Son to Magistrate in Han China

    "This book is wonderful. Only someone with Loewe's deep and broad knowledge could provide such a work of historical fiction that gives life to the gleanings of historical research that are too scattered and incomplete for the less skilled to harvest. Add to this the interesting story and this makes for an effective, useful supplementary reading for courses on Chinese history."
         —Steven Davidson, Southwestern University

  28. Byzantine Philosophy

    Basil Tatakis
    Translated, with Introduction, and Notes, by Nicholas Moutafakis

    Byzantine Philosophy

    “The translation of Tatakis’ 1949 book is a welcome contribution to the field as it offers a remarkable overview of Byzantine philosophy for specialists and students alike. . . . Moutafakis has performed a great service to the English-speaking academic world not only with his very readable translation of what is standard reading material in many universities in Europe but also with the useful list (at the end of the book) of contributions to the field made after the original French edition.”
         —Yannis Papadoyannakis, Religious Studies Review

  29. Candide

    Voltaire
    Translated, with Introduction, and Notes, by David Wootton

    Candide

    “Along with a brisk and very readable rendition of the text, this edition provides the material necessary for understanding the point of Voltaire’s satire. Wootton’s Introduction gives an excellent account of the dispute over optimism, and the supplementary texts show both the opposing points of view in this dispute, and its development on other texts of Voltaire.”
         —Christopher J. Kelly, co-editor, The Collected Writings of Rousseau

  30. Challenges to Empiricism

    Edited by Harold Morick

    Challenges to Empiricism

    ". . . an admirably chosen set of selections, and the only anthology I know of which pulls together so many diverse strands of the recent attacks on traditional empiricist views."
         —Richard Rorty, University of Virginia

    North American rights only.

  31. Charles Brockden Brown's Wieland, Ormond, Arthur Mervyn, and Edgar Huntly: 4 Vol. Set
  32. China: A History

    Harold M. Tanner

    China: A History

    "Tanner has written an excellent text on Chinese history which offers a fine balance between the traditional and the modern. He also charts a good balance between studies of the elite, government, philosophy and diplomacy and, on the other hand, analyses of ordinary people, economic institutions, social patterns, and folk religion. The book provides a comprehensive view of Chinese culture, including developments in literature and the arts. A generous selection of illustrations facilitates comprehension of and pleasure in the visual arts. Finally, Professor Tanner's consideration of Western contact with China and the attendant problems and gains is judicious and informative."
         —Morris Rossabi, Distinguished Professor of History, City University of New York

  33. China: A History, Volume 1

    Harold M. Tanner

    China: A History, Volume 1

    China: A History, Volume 1: From Neolithic Cultures through the Great Qing Empire (10,000 BCE—1799) — Now available in two volumes, this accessible, yet rigorous, introduction to the political, social, and cultural history of China provides a balanced and thoughtful account of the development of Chinese civilization from its beginnings to the present day. Each volume includes ample illustrations, a full complement of maps, a chronological table, extensive notes, recommendations for further reading and an index.

  34. China: A History, Volume 2

    Harold M. Tanner

    China: A History, Volume 2

    China: A History, Volume 2: From the Great Qing Empire through the People's Republic of China (1644—2009) — Now available in two volumes, this accessible, yet rigorous, introduction to the political, social, and cultural history of China provides a balanced and thoughtful account of the development of Chinese civilization from its beginnings to the present day. Each volume includes ample illustrations, a full complement of maps, a chronological table, extensive notes, recommendations for further reading and an index.

  35. Civil War

    Lucan
    Translated by Brian Walters
    Introduction by W.R. Johnson

    Civil War

    "Brian Walters has given us what too few translators of classical poetry do—an authorial presence. Here is Lucan himself in all his drastic modes—everything from his enraged indignation to his paradoxical aphorisms—recreating the ruptured Neronian world he lived in as he recounts the nefarious civil war that destroyed the Roman Republic."
         —Stanley Lombardo, University of Kansas

  36. Classical Arabic Philosophy

    Translated with Introduction, Notes, and Glossary by Jon McGinnis & David C. Reisman

    Classical Arabic Philosophy

    "This book will make a major impact on the study, and especially the teaching, of Arabic philosophy.  A major difficulty with this field has been the lack of any adequate textbook of sources. . . . Reisman and McGinnis not only provide here a rich selection of texts that could be the basis for even a full-year course on Arabic thought, but also manage to translate several important works for the first time; they also include some standards that would probably be missed were they not here.  It will no doubt become the standard anthology used in courses on Arabic philosophy, and I will use it this way myself.  The team of McGinnis and Reisman is an ideal one. . . All in all, this project is to be greeted with immense enthusiasm."
         —Peter Adamson, King's College London

  37. Classical Mythology in Literature, Art, and Music

    Philip Mayerson

    Classical Mythology in Literature, Art, and Music

    Originally published in the 1960s, this standard illustrated work covers the gods and heroes of the Classical world, with special emphasis on the influence Classical mythology has had on literature, art and music in Western civilization.

  38. Classics of American Political and Constitutional Thought, 2 Volume Set

    Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by Scott J. Hammond,
    Kevin R. Hardwick, & Howard L. Lubert

    Classics of American Political and Constitutional Thought, 2 Volume Set

    From James I's "Address Before Parliament" (1610) to Joseph R. Biden, Jr.'s "Learned Hand Dinner Address Before the American Jewish Committee" (2005), this two-volume set offers an unparalleled selection of key texts from the history of American political and constitutional thought. North American rights only.

  39. PNG (200 x 260)

    Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by Scott J. Hammond,
    Kevin R. Hardwick, & Howard L. Lubert

    Classics of American Political and Constitutional Thought, Vol. I

    Volume 1 (Origins through the Civil War) of a 2-volume set. From James I's "Address Before Parliament" (1610) to Joseph R. Biden, Jr.'s "Learned Hand Dinner Address Before the American Jewish Committee" (2005), this two-volume set offers an unparalleled selection of key texts from the history of American political and constitutional thought. North American rights only.

  40. PNG (200 x 260)

    Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by Scott J. Hammond,
    Kevin R. Hardwick, & Howard L. Lubert

    Classics of American Political and Constitutional Thought, Vol. II

    Volume 2 (Reconstruction to the Present) of a 2-volume set. From James I's "Address Before Parliament" (1610) to Joseph R. Biden, Jr.'s "Learned Hand Dinner Address Before the American Jewish Committee" (2005), this two-volume set offers an unparalleled selection of key texts from the history of American political and constitutional thought. North American rights only.

  41. Columbus on Himself

    Felipe Fernández-Armesto

    Columbus on Himself

    "Columbus had been the subject of many biographies, but the approach of Columbus on Himself is unique. Fernández-Armesto has created, as far as it is possible, an account of Christopher Columbus's life based on his own words. Columbus left far more potentially autobiographical writings than his contemporary explorers from the age of European expansion, but there are gaps in the record. Fernández-Armesto has arranged Columbus's writings chronologically so readers can see Columbus's development, and intersperses them with his insightful commentary. The translations are Fernández-Armesto's own. Recommended."
        —R. Fritze, Athens State University, in Choice

  42. Confessions (Second Edition)

    Augustine
    Translated by F. J. Sheed
    Introduction by Peter Brown, Notes by Michael Foley

    Confessions (Second Edition)

    “This translation is already a classic. It is the translation that has guided three generations of students and readers into a renewed appreciation of the beauty and urgency of a masterpiece of Christian autobiography. This is largely because the translator has caught not only the meaning of Augustine’s Confessions, but a large measure of its poetry.  It makes the Latin sing in English as it did when it came from the pen of Augustine, some sixteen hundred years ago. Deeply rooted in the tradition of which Augustine was himself a principal founder, this translation is not only modern: it is a faithful echo, in a language that has carried throughout the ages, of its author’s original passion and disquiet.”
         —Peter Brown

  43. Considerations on the Causes of the Greatness of the Romans and their Decline

    Montesquieu
    Translated by David Lowenthal

    Considerations on the Causes of the Greatness of the Romans and their Decline

    “It is wonderful to have David Lowenthal’s splendid translation of Montesquieu’s Considerations on the Causes of the Greatness of the Romans and their Decline back in print. This neglected masterpiece deserves attention from all who are concerned with self-government—whether their focus is on history or on its prospects in our own time.”
         —Paul A. Rahe, University of Tulsa

  44. Daily Life in Ancient Rome

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Brian K. Harvey

    Daily Life in Ancient Rome

    "There’s a tremendous amount to admire in Brian Harvey’s new Daily Life in Ancient Rome: A Sourcebook. And it stands out as a superior work against all the competing texts. Specifically, much careful thought, attention, and effort has gone into ensuring that the work is ideal for students and interested non-professionals. The texts are all translated into clear, accurate English. They are also thoroughly contextualized, both in categories as well as individually. This insistence on the historicity of the sources sets the book apart from the norm. The book also benefits from Harvey’s extensive, almost encyclopedic, knowledge of inscriptions, which are used as important sources along with the literary excerpts. Finally, the many photos by the author himself augment the texts and are themselves analyzed as unique sources."
         —Steven L. Tuck, Miami University, Ohio

  45. Daily Life in the Inca Empire

    Michael A. Malpass

    Daily Life in the Inca Empire

    Unlike most studies of the Incas, this book reconstructs the daily life not only of the ruling Inca elite but also of the rest of the society, including the conquered peoples.  From food and drink to religious rituals, the major aspects of life at all levels in the Inca empire are here described and explained in a clear, accessible way.  Over fifty illustrations are included, as are a historical timeline of the Inca empire, a glossary, and a bibliography.

  46. Daily Life in the Medieval Islamic World

    James E. Lindsay

    Daily Life in the Medieval Islamic World

    "Lindsay gives an excellent overview of the medieval Islamic world.  Intended for an audience with little or no background on this topic, the book offers a thorough introduction to the beginnings of Islam, its history up to the year 1300, and material on a wide range of other topics, e.g., warfare, social practices, entertainment, and geography. . . . Numerous maps, photographs, and illustrations are spread throughout the text. . . . This book will be very valuable to history students and anyone interested in learning about the faith and practices of Muslims.  Highly recommended."
         —Choice

  47. Daily Life in the Mongol Empire

    George Lane

    Daily Life in the Mongol Empire

    “[A] general history book that uses primary source material throughout. It introduces students to the importance of primary sources and stresses how these early texts provide the evidence and foundations for all the words, ideas, and thoughts that make up traditional history books. The excellent biographies, including one listing many of the translated primary source materials, ensure that this book will be an essential component in any library of the Mongol Empire.”
         —Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies

  48. Daily Life of the Ancient Greeks (Second Edition)

    Robert Garland

    Daily Life of the Ancient Greeks (Second Edition)

    Significantly expanded and updated in light of the most recent scholarship, the second edition of Garland's engaging introduction to ancient Greek society brings this world vividly to life—and, in doing so, explores the perspectives and morals of typical ancient Greek citizens across a wide range of societal levels. Food and drink, literacy, the plight of the elderly, the treatment of slaves, and many more aspects of daily life in ancient Greece also come into sharp focus. More than sixty illustrations are included, as are maps, a chronology, a glossary of Greek terms, and suggestions for further reading.

  49. Daily Life of the Ancient Romans

    David Matz

    Daily Life of the Ancient Romans

    "The book's use of primary sources to illustrate daily experiences makes it valuable both for the historical and cultural background it presents and for the wide array of Roman voices it includes.  Its chapter arrangement and direct, informative style make it an excellent supplementary text for courses on classical literature.  The chronology and brief biographies of Roman authors are valuable and uncomplicated resources"
         —Okey Goode, Lewis-Clark State College

  50. Daily Life of the Aztecs

    David Carrasco & Scott Sessions

    Daily Life of the Aztecs

    "This is a superb overview of Aztec society and culture.  It also provides a wonderful postscript by discussing the Spanish invasion and the compelling legacy of Aztec civilization."
        —Douglas Richmond, University of Texas at Arlington

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