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Latin Commentaries

20 Item(s)

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  1. Aeneid: Book 1

    Vergil
    Edited by Randall T. Ganiban

    Aeneid: Book 1

    "The new Vergil commentaries from Focus are an exciting resource for almost anyone reading the Aeneid in Latin. . . . The editors recognize that developing core reading skills and involving students in the interpretive questions raised by the poem are not separate objectives. This recognition has resulted in commentaries that enticingly present basic information in a wider setting of observation and enquiry. . . . All in all, the Focus series balances simplicity and subtlety, reminding students at all levels that increasing technical precision and stretching one's interpretive curiosity are—fundamentally—one endeavor."
         —Antonia Syson, Purdue University, in Teaching Classical Languages (CAMWS)

  2. Aeneid: Book 2

    Vergil
    Edited by Randall T. Ganiban

    Aeneid: Book 2

    "His introductory commentary on book II of the Aeneid, designed for students starting from an intermediate knowledge of Latin, offers the essential tools for a full understanding, correct translation, and appropriate interpretation of Vergil’s text."
         —Beatrice Larosa, Università della Calabria, in Bryn Mawr Classical Review

  3. Aeneid: Book 3

    Vergil
    Edited by Christine Perkell

    Aeneid: Book 3

    "This commentary combines grammatical assistance with analysis of the text in ways which make reading easier and encourage interpretation. It also introduces current debates in Virgilian scholarship clearly and helpfully, and promotes and provides guidance for further reading. Perkell has provided valuable support for those wishing to teach Aeneid 3 at an intermediate level, and I look forward to the other volumes in this series."
         —Anne Rogerson, University of Sydney, in Bryn Mawr Classical Review

  4. Aeneid: Book 4

    Vergil
    Edited by James J. O'Hara

    Aeneid: Book 4

    "The commentary itself is a gem, and students and teachers of Aeneid 4 alike will be very grateful to James O’Hara for the excellent job he has done to balance comments that help with translation and comprehension alongside those that allow students to engage with current scholarly debates about the interpretation of the Aeneid, as well as with Virgil's literary, philosophical and cultural contexts. . . . In conclusion, this is an engaging, learned and extremely useful commentary. It is well-directed to its intended audience of intermediate students but is also a useful resource for more advanced readers, particularly those wanting insight into the current state of scholarship on the Aeneid and significant recent debates about Book 4. It is lucid and well edited, and I highly recommend it."
         —Anne Rogerson, University of Sydney, in Bryn Mawr Classical Review

  5. Aeneid: Book 5

    Vergil
    Edited by Joseph Farrell

    Aeneid: Book 5

    Aeneid: Book 5, part of the the Focus Vergil Aeneid commentaries series, includes an introduction, Latin-language text, commentary, and other student materials. It is designed for the intermediate Latin-language student in upper division courses teaching the Aeneid in departments of Classics or Latin Language.

  6. Aeneid: Book 6

    Vergil
    Edited by Patricia Johnston

    Aeneid: Book 6

    "This is an admirable commentary, with Latin text, vocabulary, and appendix on Vergil’s meter, offering students of Vergil at the intermediate level or higher succinct grammatical, stylistic, and contextual help towards a rich understanding of the poet’s profound portrayal of Aeneas’ descent into the lower world. It is prefaced by an enticing introduction to the role played by this book in the narrative of the epic as a whole, and sections of the commentary have bibliographical references for further reading."
         —Raymond J. Clark, University of Ottawa, Canada

  7. Aeneid: Books 1–6

    Vergil
    General Editor: Randall Ganiban; Contributing Editors: Christine Perkell, James J. O'Hara, Joseph Farrell, and Patricia A. Johnston

    Aeneid: Books 1–6

    Vergil, Aeneid Books 1–6 is the first of a two-volume commentary on Vergil's epic designed specifically for today’s Latin students. These editions navigate the complexities of Vergil’s text and elucidate the stylistic and interpretive issues that enhance and sustain appreciation of the Aeneid. Editions of individual books of the Aeneid with expanded comments and vocabulary are also available from Hackett.

  8. Amphitryo

    Plautus
    Text and Commentary by Anne Mahoney

    Amphitryo

    A thorough and modern commentary on Plautus' classic comedy Amphitryo, including the 15th-century supplement for the lost scenes. With vocabulary and brief notes on meter.

  9. Archaic Latin Verse

    Mario Erasmo

    Archaic Latin Verse

    Archaic Latin Verse offers text and commentary of the earliest surviving Latin work including selections from oral verse, Livius, Naevius, Ennius, and others (Caecilius, Accius, Pacuvius, and Lucilius). For 3rd or 4th year college Latin literature survey courses that incorporate source material in Latin.

  10. Lingua Latina: Caesar: De Bello Gallico, From Books I, IV & V

    Caesar
    Hans H. Ørberg

    Lingua Latina: Caesar: De Bello Gallico, From Books I, IV & V

    De Bello Gallico is a supplemental reader in the Lingua Latina series. This text includes abridged annotated versions of Julius Caesar's firsthand account of the Gallic Wars Books I, IV and V designed for students who have finished Part I, Familia Romana or anyone interested in learning Latin using the Lingua Latina Hans Orberg method.

  11. Lingua Latina: Epitome Historiae Sacrae

    Charles-François Lhomond and Roberto Carfagni

    Lingua Latina: Epitome Historiae Sacrae

    Entirely in Latin (with vowel lengths marked), this book includes 209 readings from the Old Testament Books. There are also engaging exercises, including crosswords and matching. Epitome Historiae Sacrae been edited according to the Lingua Latina per se Illustrata series, is ideal for students who have completed Familia Romana as it drills and reviews grammar while adding more than 1,300 words to their vocabulary and modeling excellent Latin prose style. Course Instructors: The Epitome Historiae Sacrae answer key and marginal notes (by Frank Nitsche-Robinson) is available as an electronic file (PDF only) for qualified adopters. If you have adopted the text, click here to request the PDF answer key and marginal notes file.

  12. Lingua Latina: Fabulae Syrae

    Luigi Miraglia

    Lingua Latina: Fabulae Syrae

    The collection begins with the adventure of Pygmalion, the Cypriot sculptor who carved a woman out of ivory, and ends with nearly 200 verses of original Latin from books two and three of Ovid’s Metamorphoses. The vignettes are annotated with helpful margin notes and are accompanied by beautiful historic woodcut illustrations. The volume contains two appendices: a list of vocabulary and a glossary of proper names. Fabulae Syrae can be used concurrently with Familia Romana for further enrichment or as a review text after completing Familia Romana. It is, however, also a stand-alone work and could also be used as a reader in mythology separate from the Lingua Latina per se Illustrata series. New vocabulary is kept to an absolute minimum, so the reader can truly enjoy the readings, while focusing on a mastery of the grammar and essential vocabulary taught in the Familia Romana.

  13. Lingua Latina: Ovidii Nasonis: Ars Amatoria

    Ovid
    Hans H. Ørberg

    Lingua Latina: Ovidii Nasonis: Ars Amatoria

    Presented via the natural method by Hans Ørberg, Ars Amatoria (The Art of Love) allows students to read lightly altered Latin texts. The text is a poem in three books by Ovid. The first two books consist of instructions to men on the wooing of women of easy virtue; the third, of instructions to woman on seduction of men. The work is full of humor and charm, and contains interesting glimpses of Roman life and manners—the circus, the theatre, the banquet. It was perhaps partly on account of its immorality that Augustus banished the poet to Tomi by the Black Sea. These poems can be read by students who have completed the first five chapters of Ørberg's second-year text Roma Aeterna, (Lingua Latina Pars II), also available from Focus.

  14. Lingua Latina: Petronius: Cena Trimalchionis

    Petronius
    Hans H. Ørberg

    Lingua Latina: Petronius: Cena Trimalchionis

    Presented via the natural method by Hans Orberg, Petronii Cena Trimalchionis is an abridged and annotated edition of Petronius' Satryrion, with introduction and marginal notes in Latin. This text may be used as a supplemental reader in Hans Orberg's Lingua Latina per se illustrate series. This can be read by students who have finished the book Lingua Latina per se Illustrata, Familia Romana, Pars I or anyone using the Lingua Latina Orberg method to learn Latin.

  15. Lingua Latina: Plautus: Amphitryo Comoedia

    Plautus
    Hans H. Ørberg

    Lingua Latina: Plautus: Amphitryo Comoedia

    Amphitryo Comoedia  is an abridged edition with an introduction and marginal notes in Latin. It is designed for students who have finished Part I, Familia Romana or anyone interested in learning Latin using the Lingua Latina Hans Orberg method.

  16. Lingua Latina: Sallustius & Cicero: Catilina

    Sallustius & Cicero
    Hans H. Ørberg

    Lingua Latina: Sallustius & Cicero: Catilina

    This text is a supplemental reader for the Lingua Latina series that includes selections from Sallust's Catilina and Cicero's Catilinarian Speeches I and III for students who have finished Part I, Familia Romana or anyone interested in learning Latin using the Lingua Latina Hans Orberg method.

  17. Lingua Latina: Sermones Romani

    Hans H. Ørberg

    Lingua Latina: Sermones Romani

    Presented via the natural method by Hans Ørberg, Sermones Romani allows introductory students to read lightly altered Latin texts. Through his innovative system of marginal notes, Hans Ørberg introduces the reader to the language and thought of ancient Rome through short readings by Cicero, Tacitus, Martial and others. Sermones Romani can be read immediately following Ørberg’s first year elementary text, Familia Romana (Lingua Latina Pars I).

  18. Lingua Latina: Vergil: Aeneis Libros I et IV

    Vergil
    Hans H. Ørberg

    Lingua Latina: Vergil: Aeneis Libros I et IV

    Presented via the natural method by Hans Ørberg, Vergilii Aeneis Libros I et IV allows students to read lightly altered Latin texts. It includes extensive selections from the text of the Aeneid Books 1 and 4, along with indices of vocabulary and names, and marginal notes in Latin. This text is suitable for use in conjunction with Ørberg’s second-year text Roma Aeterna. (Lingua Latina Pars II), also available from Hackett, or any third year Latin course that studies Vergil.

  19. Pro Caelio

    Cicero
    Introduction and Notes by Elizabeth Keitel and Jane Crawford

    Pro Caelio

    Keitel and Crawford have produced a college level commentary of Cicero's great speech which provides insights into Roman life and culture, the nature and tools of Roman rhetoric, and, through the inclusion of correspondence and other texts, the life and friendships of Cicero himself. This volume includes the Latin text with vocabulary, exercises, notes, and an extensive introduction.

  20. Selections from Ovid

    Charles W. Dunmore

    Selections from Ovid

    This Focus Classical Reprint of Selections from Ovid offers a classic reader on Ovid from Charles W. Dunmore, professor emeritus at New York University. The text contains extensive selections from Ovid's primary works, all in Latin, with commentary and a glossary. Selections from Ovid: Metamorphoses, the Fasti, Heroides, Tristia, Epistulae ex Ponto, Amores, and Ars Amatoria.

20 Item(s)

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