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Ancient History

34 Item(s)

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  1. Aeneid

    Virgil
    Translated by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction by W. R. Johnson

    Aeneid

    "Crisp, idiomatic, and precise, this is a translation for our era. The list of further reading, grounded in the writings of W.R. Johnson (who also wrote the Introduction) and Michael C. J. Putnam, suggests the context that informs the translation: here, as the translator says in the Preface, you will find an Aeneid that works more in the shadows than in the light. . . . This translation would be excellent for classroom use: not only would it incite fascinating discussions about issues of war and empire, but it also reads well aloud. . . . Together with Johnson's Introduction, this volume offers the Aeneid in terms that will resonate strongly with the general reader of today."
         —Sarah Spence, New England Classical Journal

  2. Agricola, Germany, and Dialogue on Orators

    Tacitus
    Translated, with Introduction, by Herbert W. Benario

    Agricola, Germany, and Dialogue on Orators

    This volume provides three short works of Tacitus: Agricola—the fullest ancient account of Rome's conquest of Britain and of the public career of a senator in the service of a Roman emperor—Germany, a valuable source on the ancient land and its people, and Dialogue on Orators, an examination in the tradition of Cicero's rhetorical essays of the decline of oratory in Rome's early empire. Together, these works illuminate an important phase in Tacitus' development as Rome's foremost historian.

  3. Ancient Rome

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Christopher Francese and R. Scott Smith

    Ancient Rome

    "Terrific . . . exactly the sort of collection we have long needed: one offering a wide range of texts, both literary and documentary, and that—with the inclusion of Sulpicia and Perpetua—allows students to hear the voices of actual women from the ancient world. The translations themselves are fluid; the inclusion of long extracts allows students to sink their teeth into material in ways not possible with traditional source books. The anonymous texts, inscriptions, and other non-literary material topically arranged in the 'Documentary' section will enable students to see how the documentary evidence supplements or undermines the views advanced in the literary texts. This is a book that should be of great use to anyone teaching a survey of the history of Ancient Rome or a Roman Civilization course. I look forward to teaching with this book which is, I think, the best source book I have seen for the way we teach these days."
         —David Potter, University of Michigan

  4. Annals

    Tacitus
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by A. J. Woodman

    Annals

    "An elegant addition to Tacitean scholarship. . . . The appendices are comprehensive and extremely useful for students, covering political and military terms that are cross-referenced to the text, the deployment of the army which can be confusing in the Annals, Rome, geographical and tribal names, and maps as well as a good index of names. . . . This translation has many eminently practical features, including clear layout, the use of footnotes, and numbering of the text. . . . The Introduction is very accessible and, coupled with the text, will be very useful for students." 
        —Alisdair Gibson, Journal of Classics Teaching

  5. Athenian Funeral Orations

    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Judson Herrman

    Athenian Funeral Orations

    This volume collects all of the surviving state funeral orations from Athens, including Thucydides, Gorgias, Lysias, Plato Menexenus, Demosthenes, and Hyperides. To stimulate student discussion and comparison, Lincoln's address at Gettysburg is included in an appendix. Translations are in English, including introduction and notes, as well as literary and historical commentary.

  6. Civil War

    Lucan
    Translated by Brian Walters
    Introduction by W.R. Johnson

    Civil War

    "Brian Walters has given us what too few translators of classical poetry do—an authorial presence. Here is Lucan himself in all his drastic modes—everything from his enraged indignation to his paradoxical aphorisms—recreating the ruptured Neronian world he lived in as he recounts the nefarious civil war that destroyed the Roman Republic."
         —Stanley Lombardo, University of Kansas

  7. Classical Mythology in Literature, Art, and Music

    Philip Mayerson

    Classical Mythology in Literature, Art, and Music

    Originally published in the 1960s, this standard illustrated work covers the gods and heroes of the Classical world, with special emphasis on the influence Classical mythology has had on literature, art and music in Western civilization.

  8. Daily Life of the Ancient Greeks (Second Edition)

    Robert Garland

    Daily Life of the Ancient Greeks (Second Edition)

    Significantly expanded and updated in light of the most recent scholarship, the second edition of Garland's engaging introduction to ancient Greek society brings this world vividly to life—and, in doing so, explores the perspectives and morals of typical ancient Greek citizens across a wide range of societal levels. Food and drink, literacy, the plight of the elderly, the treatment of slaves, and many more aspects of daily life in ancient Greece also come into sharp focus. More than sixty illustrations are included, as are maps, a chronology, a glossary of Greek terms, and suggestions for further reading.

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    Virgil
    Translated, with Notes and Introduction, by Kristina Chew

    Georgics

    "Chew's translation is, both in aesthetic and scholarly terms, an excellent piece of work. I find her approach refreshing and true to the spirit of the Georgics; her adventurousness strikes me as just the thing to rescue the poem from the appearance of blandness that a more straightforward style of translationese would inevitably, but misleadingly, impose upon it. This Georgics does not read much like any previous version of it. Chew helps the English reader to get a sense of Virgil's avant-garde poetics, which is the main thing that almost all translators of the Georgics work to eliminate, if indeed they are even aware of it.
    First-rate."
         —Joseph Farrell, Professor of Classical Studies, University of Pennsylvania

  10. Greek Religion: A Sourcebook

    Valerie M. Warrior

    Greek Religion: A Sourcebook

    "Warrior's text fills a long-acknowledged void for teaching Ancient Religion. There is no real alternative. The best recommendation for her book comes from my students, who voted her Greek and Roman Sourcebooks their favorite texts in my Greek and Roman Religion course."
         —Randall M. Colaizzi, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Boston

  11. Histories

    Herodotus
    Translated by Pamela Mensch
    Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by James Romm

    Histories

    "This edition reproduces the fluent pace and readability of Herodotus' world-encompassing work. Mensch has produced a close translation of Herodotus' Greek that is also an engrossing read in English. As an old-time Herodotean, I found myself drawn into Herodotus' universe of history and story all over again. Combined with Romm's elegant introduction, which conveys the lure of Herodotus' work, the lucid maps and tables, and the pertinent, uncluttered notes, this is an edition to read for pleasure and for education. I recommend it to future students of Herodotus and their instructors, and to any reader who wants to discover and rediscover Herodotus in a vibrant new translation."
        —Emily Greenwood, Yale University

  12. Legal Speeches of Democratic Athens

    Edited and Translated by Andrew Wolpert & Konstantinos Kapparis

    Legal Speeches of Democratic Athens

    “An excellent, wide-ranging collection of Athenian speeches illuminating central topics of political, social, and legal history, including male and female sexuality, the ancient economy, Greek law, and major episodes of civic strife. Both accurate and faithful to the orators’ prose style, Wolpert and Kapparis’ new translations come accompanied by informative introductions and notes, a glossary of legal terms, and a helpful bibliography. Highly recommended for courses in the history of classical Athens, ancient rhetoric, and Greek law.”
         —Robert W. Wallace, Northwestern University

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    Plutarch
    Edited, with Introductions and Notes, by James Romm
    Translated by Pamela Mensch

    Lives that Made Greek History

    In this compilation from Plutarch's Greek Lives, James Romm gathers the material of greatest historical significance from fifteen biographies, ranging from Theseus in earliest times to Phocion in the late fourth century BCE. While preserving the outlines of Plutarch's character portraits, Romm focuses on the central stories of classical Greece: the rivalry between Athens, Sparta, and Thebes, the rise of Macedon, and the conflicts between these European states and the Achaemenid Persian empire. Bridging Plutarch’s gaps with concise summaries, Romm creates a coherent narrative of the classical Greek world.

  14. Memorable Deeds and Sayings

    Valerius Maximus
    Translated by Henry John Walker

    Memorable Deeds and Sayings

    “The publication of Henry John Walker’s translation of Memorable Deeds and Sayings ensures a wider readership for Valerius’ great compendium of Greco-Roman lore. Of the many merits of Walker’s translation, I would cite especially its readability. Walker has produced a version of Valerius Maximus that reflects the original’s wide sweep, but in Walker’s hands Valerius tells a seamless story in multiple parts. This translation will be easily used by students in the classroom and by scholars. It is a substantial accomplishment: a superior new translation that renders a monument of Latin literature accessible in every way to multiple audiences.”
         —Joseph Pucci, Brown University

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    Sophocles
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Peter Meineck and Paul Woodruff

    Oedipus Tyrannus

    "A clear, vigorous, spare, actable translation, and with it, excellent apparatus (Intro., notes, bibliography); all in a slim and affordable volume. I will use when I next teach Oedipus. Hackett is an invaluable resource!”
         —Rachel Hadas, Rutgers University

  16. On Justice, Power, and Human Nature

    Thucydides
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Paul Woodruff

    On Justice, Power, and Human Nature

    Designed for students with little or no background in ancient Greek language and culture, this collection of extracts from The History of the Peloponnesian War includes those passages that shed most light on Thucydides’ political theory—famous as well as important but lesser-known pieces frequently overlooked by nonspecialists. Newly translated into spare, vigorous English, and situated within a connective narrative framework, Woodruff’s selections will be of special interest to instructors in political theory and Greek civilization. Includes maps, notes, glossary.

  17. On the War for Greek Freedom

    Herodotus
    Translated by Samuel Shirley
    Edited, with Introduction and Annotation, by James Romm

    On the War for Greek Freedom

    Designed for students with little or no background in ancient Greek language, history, and culture, this new abridgment presents those selections that comprise Herodotus’ historical narrative. These are meticulously annotated, and supplemented with a chronology of the Archaic Age, Historical Epilogue, glossary of main characters and places, index of proper names, and maps.

  18. Race and Ethnicity in the Classical World

    Selected and Translated by Rebecca F. Kennedy, C. Sydnor Roy, and Max L. Goldman

    Race and Ethnicity in the Classical World

    "This highly affordable, lively and wide-ranging anthology will be an invaluable study resource for courses on ancient identities and ideas about foreigners. . . . It will also appeal to the general reader interested in exploring what Greeks and Romans thought and wrote about peoples often styled 'barbarian,' not least because knowledge of such material was instrumental in the formation of the modern disciplines of anthropology, ethnography and geography. Both the high quality of the translation and the fact that it presents sizable chunks of text for students to ponder make it an ideal teaching text. Wild flights of fancy, tales of mythical monstrosity and cruel/bizarre stereotypes sit side-by-side. Dicaeopolis's response seems the most apt: 'Wowzers!'"
         —Journal of Classics Teaching

  19. Readings in Classical Political Thought

    Edited by Peter J. Steinberger

    Readings in Classical Political Thought

    “A distinctive and superior collection of texts suitable for both graduate and undergraduate courses. There is nothing like it elsewhere. Steinberger’s commentary is succint, accurate, and very useful.”
         —Dr. Melvin Kulbicki, York College of Pennsylvania

  20. Roman Religion: A Sourcebook

    Valerie M. Warrior

    Roman Religion: A Sourcebook

    "Professor Warrior's book is a useful anthology of readings which, diligently chosen and intelligently arranged, display the essential elements of Roman religion in its most interesting period."
         —Christopher McDonough, Boston College

  21. Roman Sports and Spectacles

    Anne Mahoney

    Roman Sports and Spectacles

    Roman Sports and Spectacles: A Sourcebook contains numerous translations from the Latin, including famous authors, such as Cicero, Seneca, Tertullian and Augustine, and the not so famous, including graffiti, advertisements and tombstones to paint a world view of what sports Romans played and what they thought of them. The world of Roman sports was similar in many ways to our own, but there were significant differences. For one thing Roman sports centered during religious festivals and the participants were most often slaves. Roman sports were not team sports, but individual competitions. And sports like chariot racing and gladiatorial competitions were very dangerous. Each document includes an introduction to the source material.

  22. Ten Speeches

    Cicero
    Translated by James E. G. Zetzel

    Ten Speeches

    "This volume is a most welcome and much needed resource for the classroom, and a marked improvement over the Penguin editions of Cicero's selected speeches and selected political speeches, which it should supersede.  A very well-chosen selection of speeches, accurately and fluidly translated, and handsomely produced.  I especially appreciate the inclusion of clear maps and the section "Roman institutions and offices" which should prove especially useful for students."
         —Amanda Wilcox, Williams College

  23. The Caesars

    Suetonius
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Donna W. Hurley

    The Caesars

    “Donna Hurley has done a sterling job in providing us with both an Introduction to Suetonius and a translation of The Caesars that we can confidently recommend to students. Her Introduction summarizes a complex topic succinctly and is informative without being overwhelming, set at an ideal level for the student and intelligent enthusiast. Her translation is accurate and contemporary. Her primary goal is faithfulness to the original, which she achieves, but at the same time she recognizes the need to make her text clear, entertaining, and comprehensible to the modern reader, and she strikes exactly the right balance.”
         —Anthony Barrett, Emeritus, University of British Columbia

  24. The Essential Aeneid

    Virgil
    Translated and Abridged by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction by W. R. Johnson

    The Essential Aeneid

    Stanley Lombardo's deft abridgment of his 2005 translation of the Aeneid preserves the arc and weight of Virgil's epic by presenting major books in their entirety and abridged books in extended passages seamlessly fitted together with narrative bridges. W. R. Johnson's Introduction, a shortened version of his masterly Introduction to that translation, will be welcomed by both beginning and seasoned students of the Aeneid, and by students of Roman history, classical mythology, and Western civilization.

  25. The History of Rome, Books 1-5

    Livy
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Valerie M. Warrior

    The History of Rome, Books 1-5

    "Dr. Warrior . . .  wisely chose to be more literal than free, and she happily refrained from importing 'new and false metaphors'. . . . Her translation, accurate at every turn, is complemented with useful footnotes, especially in those parts of the work (e.g., the Preface) that need special elucidation.  The scholarship that went into these footnotes, as well as into the appendix articles and Dr. Warrior's own Introduction, is current and of a very high quality.  (I do not think I have ever read a better introduction to Livy.)  A useful bibliography and several maps contribute to the excellence of a book, which, like Livy's own work, is not likely ever to be surpassed."
         —Blaise Nagy, College of the Holy Cross

  26. The Law of Athens, 2 Volume Set

    A. R. W. Harrison

    The Law of Athens, 2 Volume Set

    Volume I, completed in 1968, gives a systematic account of classical Athenian law concerning family and property. Volume II, on the law of obligations and of procedure, was unfinished at the time of the author’s death in 1969. The part which concerns procedure was virtually complete and, edited by D. M. MacDowell, appeared in 1971. MacDowell has provided a new Foreword for this edition as well as a select bibliography (from 1967 to the present), which appears in both volumes. Together these distinguished works form the most detailed study of Athenian law in the last half-century.

  27. The Law of Athens, Volume 1 of 2

    A. R. W. Harrison

    The Law of Athens, Volume 1 of 2

    Volume one of a two-volume set. It may be purchased separately or in conjunction with volume two. Volume I, completed in 1968, gives a systematic account of classical Athenian law concerning family and property. Volume II, on the law of obligations and of procedure, was unfinished at the time of the author’s death in 1969. The part which concerns procedure was virtually complete and, edited by D. M. MacDowell, appeared in 1971. MacDowell has provided a new Foreword for this edition as well as a select bibliography (from 1967 to the present), which appears in both volumes. Together these distinguished works form the most detailed study of Athenian law in the last half-century.

  28. The Law of Athens, Volume 2 of 2

    A. R. W. Harrison

    The Law of Athens, Volume 2 of 2

    Volume two of a two-volume set. It may be purchased separately or in conjunction with volume one. Both volumes are available in a cloth edition when purchased together as a set. Volume I, completed in 1968, gives a systematic account of classical Athenian law concerning family and property. Volume II, on the law of obligations and of procedure, was unfinished at the time of the author’s death in 1969. The part which concerns procedure was virtually complete and, edited by D. M. MacDowell, appeared in 1971. MacDowell has provided a new Foreword for this edition as well as a select bibliography (from 1967 to the present), which appears in both volumes. Together these distinguished works form the most detailed study of Athenian law in the last half-century.

  29. The Murder of Herodes

    Translated, with Introduction, by Kathleen Freeman

    The Murder of Herodes

    These remarkable documents of Greek social and cultural history include masterpieces of lively narrative and subtle argument prepared by such orators as Lysias, Antiphon, and Demosthenes. The fifteen cases presented represent the first recorded instances of the working of a democratic jury system under a definite code of law aimed at inexpensive and equal justice for all citizens. Issues examined include murder, assault, property damage, embezzlement, contested legacies, illegal marriage, slander, and civil rights. Also provided are comprehensive background chapters on the professions of law and rhetoric in ancient Athens and explanatory notes clarifying the course of each trial.

  30. The New Politicians Of Fifth-Century Athens

    W. Robert Connor

    The New Politicians Of Fifth-Century Athens

    In this powerful contribution to our understanding of politics in fifth-century Athens, Connor constructs models of Athenian political groupings to explain the rise of the “new politicians,” young men who launched a new kind of democracy by appealing to the citizenry at large. With Pericles as prototype and Cleon as exemplar of the new politician, this engaging work provides an important insight into the politics of Athens at the height of its power.

  31. The Peloponnesian War

    Thucydides
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Steven Lattimore

    The Peloponnesian War

    The first unabridged translation into American English, and the first to take into account the wealth of Thucydidean scholarship of the last half of the twentieth century, Steven Lattimore’s translation sets a new standard for accuracy and reliability. Notes provide information necessary for a fuller understanding of problematic passages, explore their implications as well as the problems they may pose, and shed light on Thucydides as a distinctive literary artist as well as a source for historians and political theorists.

  32. The Roman History

    Velleius Paterculus
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by
    J. C. Yardley and Anthony A. Barrett

    The Roman History

    "[A] well-vetted, well-thought-out, and much overdue updated English translation. It will make Velleius accessible to undergraduates, who previously may have only read Livy, Sallust, or Tacitus. Perhaps the greatest merit of the book is its thorough notation throughout the translation. . . . a necessity for nonspecialist readers."
         —Nikolaus Overtoom, Louisiana State University in H-Net: Humanities and Social Science Reviews Online

  33. The Secret History

    Prokopios
    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Anthony Kaldellis

    The Secret History

    "This translation will be especially useful in undergraduate classes because, in the final section, Kaldellis appends translations of related passages from Prokopios's longer History of the Wars, from Justinian's legislation, and from other sixth-century primary sources.  Students can use these passages to judge for themselves how accurately the Secret History portrayed Justinian's career as well as that of this controversial empress.  Summing up: Essential."
         —T. S. Miller, Salisbury University, in CHOICE

  34. The Wars of Justinian

    Prokopios
    Translated by H. B. Dewing; Revised and Modernized, with an Introduction and Notes, by Anthony Kaldellis; Maps and Genealogies by Ian Mladjov

    The Wars of Justinian

    "At last . . . the translation that we have needed for so long: a fresh, lively, readable, and faithful rendering of Prokopios' Wars, which in a single volume will make this fundamental work of late ancient history-writing accessible to a whole new generation of students."
         —Jonathan Conant, Brown University

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