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The Russian Revolution and Its Global Impact

The Russian Revolution and Its Global Impact

A Short History with Documents

Jonathan Daly and Leonid Trofimov

Forthcoming - September 2017
Series: Passages: Key Moments in History

Format ISBN Price Qty
Cloth 978-1-62466-625-4
$69.00
Paper 978-1-62466-624-7
$18.00
Examination 978-1-62466-624-7
$3.00

Quick Overview

Series: Passages: Key Moments in History

Forthcoming - available for pre-order, pre-orders will ship when the book is released in September 2017.

OR

Forthcoming - available for pre-order, pre-orders will ship when the book is released in September 2017.

 

Contents:

  • Preface
  • Chronology
  • Glossary
  • List of Maps
  • List of Illustrations

Introduction

  • Chapter 1: Russia in Revolution and Civil War
  • Chapter 2: The Bolsheviks Engage the World
  • Chapter 3: The Russian Revolution and the Power of Communism
  • Epilogue

Documents

Section 1: Russia’s Revolutions: From the Collapse of the Monarchy to the Civil War

  • 1.1. Konstantin Pobedonoststev Blasts Parliamentarism, the Free Press, and Modern Education
  • 1.2. V. I. Lenin, Imperialism, the Highest Stage of Capitalism, 1916
  • 1.3. Soldiers Write About the War, 1915–16
  • 1.4. Order Number One, March 1, 1917 1.5. An American in Petrograd, Spring 1917
  • 1.6. Polish Independence and the Russian Revolution, March–April, 1917
  • 1.7. Lenin Calls for a Deepening of the Revolution, April 4, 1917
  • 1.8. General Session of the Petrograd Soviet, September 11, 1917
  • 1.9. Declaration of the Rights of the Working and Exploited People, January 1918
  • 1.10. Mustafa Chokaev, Reminiscences of 1917–18
  • 1.11. Aleksandra Kollontai, “Soon!” (in 48 Years’ Time), 1919
  • 1.12. Nikolai Bukharin and Evgenii Preobrazhenskii, ABC of Communism
  • 1.13. The Fate of Kiev, 1918
  • 1.14. The Russian “Internationale,” 1902-1944
  • 1.15. Appeal of Rebel Leaders to the Peasant Masses, Late July/Early August 1920

Section 2: The Bolsheviks Engage the World

  • 2.1. The Bolsheviks Take Russia Out of World War I, January–March 1918
  • 2.2. Soviet Protest against Allied Intervention, June 27, 1918
  • 2.3. V. I. Lenin, “A Letter to American Workingmen,” August 20, 1918
  • 2.4. Pitfalls of Intervention, 1918–20
  • 2.5. Bolshevik Anticipation of a Revolutionary Wave in 1919
  • 2.6. Report of the Chief of the International Relations Section of the Comintern, March 1, 1921
  • 2.7. Toward World Revolution, July 3, 1921
  • 2.8. The Treaty of Rapallo, April 16, 1922
  • 2.9. J. Stalin, “The Political Tasks of the University of the Toiling Peoples of the East,” 1925
  • 2.10. Bolshevik Influence in China, 1920s
  • 2.11. Fighting over the Torch of the Revolution: Trotsky versus Stalin

Section 3: The Russian Revolution and the Power of Communism

  • 3.1. John Reed on the Revolution and Socialism, 1919
  • 3.2. “Russia Did It,” 1919
  • 3.3. Bela Kun, “Discipline and Centralized Leadership,” 1923
  • 3.4. Otto Ruhle, “Moscow and Us,” 1920
  • 3.5. French Writer Romain Rolland Responds to a Call to Join the Revolutionary Cause, February 2, 1922
  • 3.6 Emma Goldman Rejects Bolshevik Policies, 1922-23
  • 3.7. “The Russian Problem,” 1919
  • 3.8. Hitler’s Lessons from the Russian Revolution, 1923-26
  • 3.9. “The Zinoviev Letter” Roils British Politics, 1924
  • 3.10. Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain’s unease about Soviet Russia, 1939.
  • 3.11. “A Bright and a Heartening Phenomenon in a Dark and Dismal World,” 1933-1936
  • 3.12. Josiah Gumede, “The New Jerusalem,” 1927
  • 3.13. W. E. B. Du Bois Discovers Soviet Russia (ca. 1928)
  • 3.14. José Carlos Mariátegui Welcomes World Revolution 
  • 3.15. Dr. José Lanauze Rolón’s Radio Address in Puerto Rico Extolls the Russian Revolution, 1936 
  • 3.16. Mao Zedong’s Retrospective of the Revolutionary Struggle, 1949


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