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Women in Colonial Latin America, 1526 to 1806

Women in Colonial Latin America, 1526 to 1806

Texts and Contexts

Edited, with an Introduction, by Nora E. Jaffary and Jane E. Mangan

September 2018 - 328 pp.

Format ISBN Price Qty
Cloth (no dust jacket) 978-1-62466-751-0
$66.00
Paper 978-1-62466-750-3
$22.00
Examination 978-1-62466-750-3
$4.00

Quick Overview

"This outstanding collection makes available for the first time a remarkable range of primary sources that will enrich courses on women as well as Latin American history more broadly. Within these pages are captivating stories of enslaved African and indigenous women who protest abuse; of women who defend themselves from charges of witchcraft, cross-dressing, and infanticide; of women who travel throughout the empire or are left behind by the men in their lives; and of women’s strategies for making a living in a world of cross-cultural exchanges. Jaffary and Mangan's excellent Introduction and annotations provide context and guide readers to think critically about crucial issues related to the intersections of gender with conquest, religion, work, family, and the law." Sarah Chambers, University of Minnesota

"Mangan and Jaffary's volume offers an impressive collection of primary sources for Latin American women’s history. It includes texts covering a diversity of women, times, and places across this broad region; shows that women were agents of survival and change for themselves and others; and humanizes the experience of colonial life for specific individuals and families across a long period. This book will be very usable in courses on Latin American, gender, social, and cultural history. I highly recommend it." —Susan Kellogg, University of Houston

OR

An eBook edition is available for $17.50, click here for more information and purchasing options. Ebook examination copies are also available to qualified course instructors.

"This outstanding collection makes available for the first time a remarkable range of primary sources that will enrich courses on women as well as Latin American history more broadly. Within these pages are captivating stories of enslaved African and indigenous women who protest abuse; of women who defend themselves from charges of witchcraft, cross-dressing, and infanticide; of women who travel throughout the empire or are left behind by the men in their lives; and of women’s strategies for making a living in a world of cross-cultural exchanges. Jaffary and Mangan's excellent Introduction and annotations provide context and guide readers to think critically about crucial issues related to the intersections of gender with conquest, religion, work, family, and the law."
      —Sarah Chambers, University of Minnesota

"Mangan and Jaffary's volume offers an impressive collection of primary sources for Latin American women’s history. It includes texts covering a diversity of women, times, and places across this broad region; shows that women were agents of survival and change for themselves and others; and humanizes the experience of colonial life for specific individuals and families across a long period. This book will be very usable in courses on Latin American, gender, social, and cultural history. I highly recommend it."
      —Susan Kellogg, University of Houston


CONTENTS

List of Maps, Acknowledgments, Introduction

1. Grant of Tacuba by Hernán Cortés to Isabel Moctezuma, Firstborn Daughter of Moctezuma II and Her Last Will and Testament (Mexico City, 1526, 1550)

2. Beatríz, India's, Lawsuit for Freedom from Slavery (Castile, Spain, 1558–1574), Introduction and Translation by Nancy E. van Deusen

3. Women's Wills (Potosí, 1577 and 1601; La Plata, 1598 and 1658)

4. Midwife Francisca Díaz's Petition to Return to Mexico (Seville, 1566)

5. Life and Love in Women's Letters to Spouses  (Spain and Mexico, 1567–1576)

6. Mothers and Wives in Labor Agreements (Arequipa, 1590; La Plata, 1602; and Potosí, 1571 and 1659)

7. Criminal Complaint by Angela de Palacios on  Behalf of her Daughter, Leonor Arias (Potosí, 1584)

8. Bárbara López, India, Accuses Her Husband of Abuse (Santa Fe, 1612)

9. Sor Ana's Travel Excerpt from Mexico to Manila  (Mexico and Manila, 1620), Introduction and Translation by Sara E. Owens

10. The Spiritual Diary of an Afro–Peruvian Mystic,  Úrsula de Jesús (Lima, 1647–1661), Translation by Nancy E. van Deusen

11. Isabel Hernández, Midwife and Healer, Appears Before the Inquisition (Mexico, 1652)

12. Don Juan de Vargas y Orellana Accuses His Wife Doña  Francisca de Marquina of Abortion (Potosí, 1703)

13. Founding Corpus Christi, a Convent for Indigenous  Women (Mexico City, 1723)

14. An African Woman Petitions for Freedom in a Colonial  Brazilian Mining Town (Vila Rica, 1766), Introduction and Translation by Mariana Dantas

15. Isabel Victoria García Sues the Hacienda del Trapiche  over Land Ownership (Pamplona, Colombia, 1777)

16. Between Heaven and Earth: Thereza de Jesús Maria Jozé’s  Last Will and Testament (Cachoeira, Bahia, 1777), Introduction and Translation by Caroline Garriott

17. Natividad, Negra, Sues Her Owner for Freedom (Lima, 1792)

18. A Colonial Cross-Dresser (Mexico, 1796)

19. Ana Gallum, Freed Slave and Property Owner (Florida, 1801), Introduction and Translation by Jane Landers

20. A Female Slave Owner's Abuse of an Enslaved Woman (Neiva, Colombia, 1803)

21. María del Carmen Ventura’s Criminal Trial for Infanticide (Zaqualtipan, Mexico, 1806)

Glossary, Bibliography, Index

 

About the Authors:

Nora E. Jaffary is Professor of History, Concordia University.

Jane E. Mangan is Mary Reynolds Babcock Professor of History and Latin American Studies at Davidson College.