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New in Ancient History

6 Item(s)

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  1. Ancient Rome

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Christopher Francese and R. Scott Smith

    Ancient Rome

    "Terrific . . . exactly the sort of collection we have long needed: one offering a wide range of texts, both literary and documentary, and that—with the inclusion of Sulpicia and Perpetua—allows students to hear the voices of actual women from the ancient world. The translations themselves are fluid; the inclusion of long extracts allows students to sink their teeth into material in ways not possible with traditional source books. The anonymous texts, inscriptions, and other non-literary material topically arranged in the 'Documentary' section will enable students to see how the documentary evidence supplements or undermines the views advanced in the literary texts. This is a book that should be of great use to anyone teaching a survey of the history of Ancient Rome or a Roman Civilization course. I look forward to teaching with this book which is, I think, the best source book I have seen for the way we teach these days."
         —David Potter, University of Michigan

  2. Daily Life in Ancient Rome

    Edited and Translated, with an Introduction, by Brian K. Harvey

    Daily Life in Ancient Rome

    "There’s a tremendous amount to admire in Brian Harvey’s new Daily Life in Ancient Rome: A Sourcebook. And it stands out as a superior work against all the competing texts. Specifically, much careful thought, attention, and effort has gone into ensuring that the work is ideal for students and interested non-professionals. The texts are all translated into clear, accurate English. They are also thoroughly contextualized, both in categories as well as individually. This insistence on the historicity of the sources sets the book apart from the norm. The book also benefits from Harvey’s extensive, almost encyclopedic, knowledge of inscriptions, which are used as important sources along with the literary excerpts. Finally, the many photos by the author himself augment the texts and are themselves analyzed as unique sources."
         —Steven L. Tuck, Miami University, Ohio

  3. Daily Life of the Ancient Greeks (Second Edition)

    Robert Garland

    Daily Life of the Ancient Greeks (Second Edition)

    Significantly expanded and updated in light of the most recent scholarship, the second edition of Garland's engaging introduction to ancient Greek society brings this world vividly to life—and, in doing so, explores the perspectives and morals of typical ancient Greek citizens across a wide range of societal levels. Food and drink, literacy, the plight of the elderly, the treatment of slaves, and many more aspects of daily life in ancient Greece also come into sharp focus. More than sixty illustrations are included, as are maps, a chronology, a glossary of Greek terms, and suggestions for further reading.

  4. Histories

    Herodotus
    Translated by Pamela Mensch
    Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by James Romm

    Histories

    "This edition reproduces the fluent pace and readability of Herodotus' world-encompassing work. Mensch has produced a close translation of Herodotus' Greek that is also an engrossing read in English. As an old-time Herodotean, I found myself drawn into Herodotus' universe of history and story all over again. Combined with Romm's elegant introduction, which conveys the lure of Herodotus' work, the lucid maps and tables, and the pertinent, uncluttered notes, this is an edition to read for pleasure and for education. I recommend it to future students of Herodotus and their instructors, and to any reader who wants to discover and rediscover Herodotus in a vibrant new translation."
        —Emily Greenwood, Yale University

  5. PNG

    Plutarch
    Edited, with Introductions and Notes, by James Romm
    Translated by Pamela Mensch

    Lives that Made Greek History

    In this compilation from Plutarch's Greek Lives, James Romm gathers the material of greatest historical significance from fifteen biographies, ranging from Theseus in earliest times to Phocion in the late fourth century BCE. While preserving the outlines of Plutarch's character portraits, Romm focuses on the central stories of classical Greece: the rivalry between Athens, Sparta, and Thebes, the rise of Macedon, and the conflicts between these European states and the Achaemenid Persian empire. Bridging Plutarch’s gaps with concise summaries, Romm creates a coherent narrative of the classical Greek world.

  6. Race and Ethnicity in the Classical World

    Selected and Translated by Rebecca F. Kennedy, C. Sydnor Roy, and Max L. Goldman

    Race and Ethnicity in the Classical World

    "This highly affordable, lively and wide-ranging anthology will be an invaluable study resource for courses on ancient identities and ideas about foreigners. . . . It will also appeal to the general reader interested in exploring what Greeks and Romans thought and wrote about peoples often styled 'barbarian,' not least because knowledge of such material was instrumental in the formation of the modern disciplines of anthropology, ethnography and geography. Both the high quality of the translation and the fact that it presents sizable chunks of text for students to ponder make it an ideal teaching text. Wild flights of fancy, tales of mythical monstrosity and cruel/bizarre stereotypes sit side-by-side. Dicaeopolis's response seems the most apt: 'Wowzers!'"
         —Journal of Classics Teaching

6 Item(s)

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