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Classical Studies

Items 201 to 250 of 393 total

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  1. Meno (Anastaplo & Berns Edition)

    Plato
    Translated, with Annotations, by George Anastaplo and Lawrence Berns

    Meno (Anastaplo & Berns Edition)

    "This new translation of the Meno by Anastaplo and Berns has several distinctive features that make it useful for teaching and studying the dialogue. Generally achieving a balance between clarity and faithfulness, it includes valuable annotation, two appendices . . . and an innovative division of the text through the provision of numbers for each of it's speeches. . . . The overall result is a text that would give a reader unschooled in Greek a fairly reliable sense of the flow of ideas in the original."
         —William A. Welton, Loyola College, in Review of Metaphysics

  2. Meno (Grube, Second Edition)

    Plato
    Translated by G. M. A. Grube

    Meno (Grube, Second Edition)

    “Fine translation, good notes—inexpensive, too!”
         —D.A. Rohatyn, University of San Diego

  3. Metamorphoses (Ambrose Edition)

    Ovid
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Z. Philip Ambrose

    Metamorphoses (Ambrose Edition)

    This complete verse translation of Ovid's classical work is illustrated with extensive notes, an index, and glossary. To help the reader contend with Ovid's frequent leaps both ahead and back in time, the principle episodes are listed at the beginning of each book and the subsections and digressions marked with indentations. Some footnotes also refer to mythological material Ovid has derived from Greek epic or drama or, occasionally, from later sources. Specific authors referred to in these notes are briefly identified in the index and glossary.

  4. Metamorphoses (Lombardo Edition)

    Ovid
    Translated by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction by W. R. Johnson

    Metamorphoses (Lombardo Edition)

    "Stanley Lombardo successfully matches Ovid’s human drama, imaginative brio, and irresistible momentum; and Ralph Johnson’s superb Introduction to Ovid's 'narratological paradise' is a bonus to this new and vigorous translation that should not be missed. Together, Introduction and text bring out the delightful unpredictability of Ovid’s 'history of the world' down to his times."
         —Elaine Fantham, Giger Professor of Latin, Emerita, Princeton University

  5. Metaphysics

    Aristotle
    Translated by Montgomery Furth

    Metaphysics

    “About as close to Aristotle’s Greek, syntax and all, as one can get in English.”
         —Arthur Madigan, S.J., Boston College

  6. Minor Authors of the Corpus Tibullianum
  7. Morice's Stories in Attic Greek

    Anne Mahoney

    Morice's Stories in Attic Greek

    A delightful collection of straightforward prose narratives, divided into 100-word sections. These stories are suitable for intermediate-level Greek students who have seen all or most of the grammar. Vocabulary and appendix of proper names. Because Morice chose characters and incidents from history and mythology, these stories also serve to introduce Ancient Greek culture.

     

  8. Neoplatonic Philosophy

    Translated, with Introduction, by John Dillon and Lloyd P. Gerson

    Neoplatonic Philosophy

    The most comprehensive collection of Neoplatonic writings available in English, this volume provides translations of the central texts of four major figures of the Neoplatonic tradition: Plotinus, Porphyry, Iamblichus, and Proclus. The general Introduction gives an overview of the period and takes a brief but revealing look at the history of ancient philosophy from the viewpoint of the Neoplatonists. Historical background—essential for understanding these powerful, difficult, and sometimes obscure thinkers—is provided in extensive footnotes, which also include cross-references to other works relevant to particular passages.

  9. Neoplatonism

    R. T. Wallis
    New Foreword and Bibliography by Lloyd P. Gerson

    Neoplatonism

    “An admirable account of a very difficult subject, remarkable for the erudition that clearly lies behind it as well as for its lucidity and good sense.”
         —Times Literary Supplement

  10. Nepos Life of Atticus
  11. Nepos Life of Dion
  12. New First Steps in Latin, Revised and Corrected

    Lee Pearcy, Mary Allen, Thomas Kent, Michael Klaassen, Mary Van Dyke Konopka, and Alexander Pearson

    New First Steps in Latin, Revised and Corrected

    New First Steps in Latin is the first book in a three-book series designed specifically for middle or high school students. The texts employ a minimum of explanation of grammatical principles, concentrate on essential grammar and morphology and on the syntax of simple, compound, and complex sentences. The focus on learning is through numerous examples. The series offers students a complete graded introduction to Latin and grammar. It can be used alone, as a main text supplemented by readings and cultural material, or as a supplementary grammatical work text for a reading-oriented course.

  13. New Second Steps in Latin, Revised and Corrected

    Lee Pearcy, Mary Allen, Thomas Kent, Michael Klaassen, Mary Van Dyke Konopka, and Alexander Pearson

    New Second Steps in Latin, Revised and Corrected

    New Second Steps in Latin is the second book in a three-book series designed specifically for middle or high school students. The texts employ a minimum of explanation of grammatical principles, concentrate on essential grammar and morphology and on the syntax of simple, compound, and complex sentences. The focus on learning is through numerous examples. The series offers students a complete graded introduction to Latin and grammar. It can be used alone, as a main text supplemented by readings and cultural material, or as a supplementary grammatical work text for a reading-oriented course.

  14. New Selected Odes of Pindar
  15. New Third Steps in Latin, Revised and Corrected

    Lee Pearcy, Mary Allen, Thomas Kent, Michael Klaassen, Mary Van Dyke Konopka, and Alexander Pearson

    New Third Steps in Latin, Revised and Corrected

    New Third Steps in Latin is the third book in a three-book series designed specifically for middle or high school students. The texts employ a minimum of explanation of grammatical principles, concentrate on essential grammar and morphology and on the syntax of simple, compound, and complex sentences. The focus on learning is through numerous examples. The series offers students a complete graded introduction to Latin and grammar. It can be used alone, as a main text supplemented by readings and cultural material, or as a supplementary grammatical work text for a reading-oriented course.

  16. Nicomachean Ethics (Irwin, Second Edition)

    Aristotle
    Translated, with Introduction, by Terence Irwin

    Nicomachean Ethics (Irwin, Second Edition)

    Building on the strengths of the first edition, the second edition of the Irwin Nicomachean Ethics features a revised translation (with little editorial intervention), expanded notes (including a summary of the argument of each chapter), an expanded Introduction, and a revised glossary.

  17. Nicomachean Ethics (Reeve Edition)

    Aristotle
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by C. D. C. Reeve

    Nicomachean Ethics (Reeve Edition)

    Series: The New Hackett Aristotle

    "C. D. C. Reeve's masterful new translation of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics will become a classic: it is clear and readable; its interpretive implications are far-reaching; it is philosophically illuminating. Reeve's scholarly notes—with detailed textual cross-references to the rest of Aristotle's works—integrate the ethics with the metaphysics, the politics, and the philosophy of mind. The book is an invaluable resource, useful to students and scholars alike."
         —Amelie Rorty, Tufts University and Harvard Medical School

  18. Nicomachean Ethics (Sachs Edition)

    Aristotle
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Joe Sachs

    Nicomachean Ethics (Sachs Edition)

    "Sachs's translations of Aristotle are truly exemplary. They combine a rare sensitivity to Aristotle's use of the Greek language with an English style that is straightforward and imaginative. But what makes Sachs's translations even more noteworthy is their attunement born of profound awareness of the untranslatability of this thought into modern philosophical concepts. For anyone seriously interested in Aristotle's philosophy, Sachs's translations are indispensable."
         —Burt Hopkins, Seattle University

  19. Nunc Loquamur: Guided Conversations for Latin (Second Edition)

    Thomas McCarthy

    Nunc Loquamur: Guided Conversations for Latin (Second Edition)

    Nunc Loquamur is an illustrated text for students new to Latin who want to incorporate speaking Latin into their study. Through rich drawings by the author, students are provided situations common to the classroom and their lives in which to speak to one another, along with clues and vocabulary necessary for basic conversations. Additional Resources: Free audio and interactive software for Nunc Loquamur is available online at: http://www.discamus.com/nunc/

  20. Odysseus at Troy

    Edited by Stephen Esposito

    Odysseus at Troy

    Odysseus at Troy is centered on the mythological Greek warrior, Odysseus, hero of the Trojan War. This book contains three plays: Sophocles' Ajax, Euripides' Hecuba, and Euripides' Trojan Women. The plays are complete, with notes and introductions for each. An additional introduction to the volume gives background on this popular theme, and on Ajax, one of the most written-about hero in Greek literature. 

  21. PNG

    Homer
    Translated by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction by Sheila Murnaghan

    Odyssey

    "[Lombardo] has brought his laconic wit and love of the ribald. . . to his version of the Odyssey. His carefully honed syntax gives the narrative energy and a whirlwind pace. The lines, rhythmic and clipped, have the tautness and force of Odysseus' bow."
         —Chris Hedges, The New York Times Book Review

  22. PNG

    Sophocles
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Peter Meineck and Paul Woodruff

    Oedipus Tyrannus

    "A clear, vigorous, spare, actable translation, and with it, excellent apparatus (Intro., notes, bibliography); all in a slim and affordable volume. I will use when I next teach Oedipus. Hackett is an invaluable resource!”
         —Rachel Hadas, Rutgers University

  23. Oidipous at Colonus

    Sophocles
    Translated, with Introduction and Essay, by Ruby Blondell

    Oidipous at Colonus

    This is an English translation of Sophocles' tragedy of Oedipus who is banished from Thebes and confronts an array of obstacles that stand between him and the death he craves. Focus Classical Library provides close translations with notes and essays to provide access to understanding Greek culture. Includes maps, essays and suggestions for further reading.

  24. On Great Writing (On The Sublime)

    Longinus
    Translated, with Introduction, by G. M. A. Grube

    On Great Writing (On The Sublime)

    Celebrated for its own clarity and sublime style, this classic work of literary theory draws on the writings of Demosthenes, Plato, Sappho, Thucydides, Euripides, and Aeschylus, among others, to examine and delineate the essentials of a noble style. The complete translation, from the Greek of A. O. Prickard’s Oxford text, features an introduction by Grube, establishing the historical and critical context of the work, and a biographical index.

  25. On Justice, Power, and Human Nature

    Thucydides
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Paul Woodruff

    On Justice, Power, and Human Nature

    Designed for students with little or no background in ancient Greek language and culture, this collection of extracts from The History of the Peloponnesian War includes those passages that shed most light on Thucydides’ political theory—famous as well as important but lesser-known pieces frequently overlooked by nonspecialists. Newly translated into spare, vigorous English, and situated within a connective narrative framework, Woodruff’s selections will be of special interest to instructors in political theory and Greek civilization. Includes maps, notes, glossary.

  26. On Poetry and Style

    Aristotle
    Translated by G. M. A. Grube

    On Poetry and Style

    Contains the Poetics and the first twelve chapters of the Rhetoric, Book III.

  27. On the Nature of Things (Englert Edition)

    Lucretius
    Translated by Walter Englert

    On the Nature of Things (Englert Edition)

    "Englert's translation of the poem is indeed accurate and readable. He knows the poem as thoroughly as he knows the scholarship that bears on it . . . an admirable translation, admirably supported by scholarly tools."
         —W.R. Johnson, University of Chicago

  28. On the Nature of Things (Smith Edition)

    Lucretius
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Martin Ferguson Smith

    On the Nature of Things (Smith Edition)

    "Martin Ferguson Smith has for many years been one of the leading Lucretian scholars in the world. . . . We should expect from the beginning then that we are in the hands of a wise and learned guide as soon as we open his Lucretius, and this expectation is certainly borne out by the quality of this sensitive and thoughtful edition. . . . The Introduction . . . is excellent. Smith outlines in a highly accessible manner what little is known of Lucretius' life and times, the poem's position and status in the Epic and Didactic tradition, and the philosophy of Epicurus that Lucretius puts forward, but also manages to include some of the most up to date research, including recent scholarship on the Herculaneum papyri. . . . But of course, the translation is the most important part of the work . . . [and] it is streets ahead of the competition. . . . I can recommend this book unreservedly."
         —Gordon Campbell, Hermathena

  29. On the War for Greek Freedom

    Herodotus
    Translated by Samuel Shirley
    Edited, with Introduction and Annotation, by James Romm

    On the War for Greek Freedom

    Designed for students with little or no background in ancient Greek language, history, and culture, this new abridgment presents those selections that comprise Herodotus’ historical narrative. These are meticulously annotated, and supplemented with a chronology of the Archaic Age, Historical Epilogue, glossary of main characters and places, index of proper names, and maps.

  30. Oresteia

    Aeschylus
    Translated, with Notes, by Peter Meineck
    Introduction by Helene P. Foley

    Oresteia

    “Peter Meineck’s new rendition of the Oresteia is that rare and wonderful thing: a text accessible to the Greekless audience while still preserving the vocabulary of Aeschylus. Those of us who have seen Peter Meineck's performances have long marveled at his ability to turn Greek into clear English, how he does not do ‘versions’ of the plays, how he does not rewrite the ancients into modern jargon (even his comedies maintain more Aristophanic text than is usual). Here lines that students have always needed explicated stand clear. . . . Helene Foley has provided a fine introduction for this translation. Introduction and translation together provide an exciting text, one that should be widely read, widely used.”
         —Karelisa Hartigan, University of Florida, in The Classical Outlook

  31. Ovid Ars Amatoria, Book 1
  32. Ovid Fasti, Book 2
  33. Ovid Fasti, Book 5
  34. Parmenides (Gill & Ryan Edition)

    Plato
    Translated by Mary Louise Gill and Paul Ryan
    Introduction by Mary Louise Gill

    Parmenides (Gill & Ryan Edition)

    “Gill’s and Ryan’s Parmenides is, simply, superb: the Introduction, more than a hundred pages long, is transparently clear, takes the reader meticulously through the arguments, avoids perverseness, and still manages to make sense of the dialogue as a whole; there is a fine selective bibliography; and those parts of the translation I have looked at in detail suggest that it too is very good indeed.”
         —Christopher Rowe, Phronesis

  35. Parmenides (Whitaker Edition)

    Plato
    Translated, with Introduction, by Albert Keith Whitaker

    Parmenides (Whitaker Edition)

    "Keith Whitaker's insightful introduction to this notoriously daunting text is valuable for its clarity and sobriety. The lucid interpretation will be of interest to those versed in the text and will be of great help to any who encounter the dialogue for the first time. The engaging translation humanizes the discourse without compromising its precision-a notable achievement that will earn the gratitude of readers."
         —Joseph Cropsey, University of Chicago

  36. Parmenides: Fragments
  37. Passio Sanctarum Perpetuae Et Felicitatis
  38. Paul Epistle to the Romans
  39. Paul First Letter to the Corinthians
  40. Persius Saturae
  41. Petrarch Selected Letters
  42. Phaedo (Brann, Kalkavage, & Salem Edition)

    Plato
    Translated, with Introduction and Glossary, by Eva Brann, Peter Kalkavage, and Eric Salem

    Phaedo (Brann, Kalkavage, & Salem Edition)

    "This marvelously conceived new translation of Plato's most important dialogue will set the standard for classroom use for many years to come. . . . The authors' imaginative new interpretation will inspire students and generate scholarly controversy-and is thus certain to accomplish what it suggests is the true aim of Socratic inquiry: the weaving, unweaving, and perpetual re-weaving of the Logos."
         —Dr. George R. Lucas, Jr., Professor of Philosophy, US Naval Academy, Annapolis

  43. Phaedo (Grube, Second Edition)

    Plato
    Translated by G. M. A. Grube

    Phaedo (Grube, Second Edition)

    “A first rate translation at a reasonable price.”
         —Michael Rohr, Rutgers University

  44. Phaedrus (Nehamas & Woodruff Edition)

    Plato
    Translated by Alexander Nehamas and Paul Woodruff

    Phaedrus (Nehamas & Woodruff Edition)

    "A superb translation that captures the rhetorical brilliance of the Greek. . . . The translation is faithful in the very best sense: it reflects both the meaning and the beauty of the Greek text. . . . The footnotes are always helpful, never obtrusive. A one-page outline is useful since there are no editorial additions to mark major divisions in the dialogue. An appendix containing fragments of early Greek love poetry helps the reader appreciate the rich, and perhaps elusive, meaning of eros. . . . The entire Introduction is crisply written, and the authors' erudition shines throughout, without a trace of pedantry. . . . this is an excellent book that deservedly should find wide circulation for many years to come."
         —Tim Mahoney, University of Texas at Arlington

  45. Phaedrus (Scully Edition)

    Plato
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Stephen Scully

    Phaedrus (Scully Edition)

    "This is a fine translation, both fluent and accurate. It captures the range of tonalities of the original in elegant English that is neither stiffly formal nor cheaply colloquial. . . . The supplementary matter is appropriate and useful. The introduction is crisp and clear, the interpretive essay illuminating. . . . Scully has done a sound and serious job of translating and annotating for the general reader. Above all, his translation is excellent in respect to style and clarity: really a pleasure to read."
         —David Konstan, Brown University

  46. Philebus

    Plato
    Translated by Dorothea Frede

    Philebus

    This translation by Dorothea Frede of Plato’s dialogue on the nature of pleasure and its relation to thought and knowledge achieves a high standard of readability and fidelity to the Greek text. The volume includes a cogent introduction, notes, and comprehensive bibliography by Frede.

  47. Philoctetes

    Sophocles
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Peter Meineck and Paul Woodruff

    Philoctetes

    "Peter Meineck has given us a superbly vivid rendering of the play, informed throughout by his practical experience in the theater. His is a Philoctetes that is supremely alive, from start to finish. . . . [I]deal for classroom use. . . . accompanied by a new and thoughtful introduction from philosopher and classicist Paul Woodruff. Woodruff anchors the play in the complex web of fears and anxieties of 409 BCE, as both Sophocles' life and Athens' imperial heyday drew to a close. . . . [A]n exceptionally fine work of translation and scholarship that will go far toward demolishing dismissals of the play as inaccessible or unengaging for the modern reader. Sophocles, Meineck and Woodruff eloquently remind us, speaks to every age, not least our own."
         —Thomas R. Keith, Loyola University Chicago in CJ-Online

  48. Philoktetes

    Sophocles
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Seth L. Schein

    Philoktetes

    "Seth Schein's new translation of the Philoctetes will serve as a useful text for upper-year classical literature courses in translation. As is typical of the Focus Classical Library series, Schein's translation aims to give a faithful rendering of the Greek that is at the same time readable, if not poetic. It also situates the work in its historical context and generally provides the supplementary material required for readers new to Attic tragedy. . . . Given that it provides more contextual information and interpretive detail than the average translation, and that the translation itself strives for greater fidelity to the original, Schein's work will be most welcome in upper-year translation courses, where it will encourage students to develop a more detailed and subtle understanding of the play."
          —Brad Levett, Carleton University

  49. Philosophy Before Socrates (Second Edition)

    Richard D. McKirahan

    Philosophy Before Socrates (Second Edition)

    The second edition of Philosophy Before Socrates has been updated and expanded to reflect important new discoveries and the most recent scholarship. Changes and additions have been made throughout, the most significant of which are found in the chapters on the Pythagoreans, Parmenides, Zeno, Anaxagoras, and Empedocles, and the new chapter on Philolaus. The translations of some passages have been revised, as have some interpretations and discussions. A new Appendix provides translations of three Hippocratic writings and the Derveni papyrus.

  50. Plato Apology

Items 201 to 250 of 393 total

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