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Classical Literature

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  1. A History of Greek Literature

    Albin Lesky
    Translated by James Willis and Cornelis De Heer

    A History of Greek Literature

    “If the student of Greek literature has room on his shelf for only one volume besides his texts, lexica, and grammar, that book should be Lesky.”
         —Moses Hadas, The Classical World

  2. Achilleid
  3. Aeneid

    Virgil
    Translated by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction by W. R. Johnson

    Aeneid

    "Crisp, idiomatic, and precise, this is a translation for our era. The list of further reading, grounded in the writings of W.R. Johnson (who also wrote the Introduction) and Michael C. J. Putnam, suggests the context that informs the translation: here, as the translator says in the Preface, you will find an Aeneid that works more in the shadows than in the light. . . . This translation would be excellent for classroom use: not only would it incite fascinating discussions about issues of war and empire, but it also reads well aloud. . . . Together with Johnson's Introduction, this volume offers the Aeneid in terms that will resonate strongly with the general reader of today."
         —Sarah Spence, New England Classical Journal

  4. Alcestis, Medea, Hippolytus

    Euripides
    Translated by Diane Arnson Svarlien
    Introduction and Notes by Robin Mitchell-Boyask

    Alcestis, Medea, Hippolytus

    This new volume of three of Euripides' most celebrated plays offers graceful, economical, metrical translations that convey the wide range of effects of the playwright's verse, from the idiomatic speech of its dialogue to the high formality of its choral odes.

  5. Andromache, Hecuba, Trojan Women

    Euripides
    Translated by Diane Arnson Svarlien
    Introduction and Notes by Ruth Scodel

    Andromache, Hecuba, Trojan Women

    Diane Arnson Svarlien’s translation of Euripides’ Andromache, Hecuba, and Trojan Women exhibits the same scholarly and poetic standards that have won praise for her Alcestis, Medea, Hippolytus. Ruth Scodel’s Introduction examines the cultural and political context in which Euripides wrote, and provides analysis of the themes, structure, and characters of the plays included. Her notes offer expert guidance to readers encountering these works for the first time.

  6. Antigone

    Sophocles
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Paul Woodruff

    Antigone

    “A lucid, well-paced translation, natural enough sounding in the dialogue to make a good acting version, and remarkably successful in making the choruses clear, lyrical, and yet part of the dramatic movement. Woodruff’s rendering of the choruses especially impresses me by the way he manages to render complex syntax and imagery of the original—often tangled and occasionally obscure in its allusiveness—into clear and genuinely poetic English.”
         —Joseph Russo, Haverford College

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    Aristophanes
    Translated, with Notes, by Peter Meineck
    Introduction by Ian C. Storey

    Aristophanes 1: Clouds, Wasps, Birds

    Originally adapted for the stage, Peter Meineck’s revised translations achieve a level of fidelity appropriate for classroom use while managing to preserve the wit and energy that led The New Yorker to judge his Clouds “The best Greek drama we’ve ever seen anywhere,” and The Times Literary Supplement to describe his Wasps as “Hugely enjoyable and very, very funny.” A general Introduction, introductions to the plays, and detailed notes on staging, history, religious practice and myth combine to make this a remarkably useful teaching text.

  8. Bacchae (Woodruff Edition)

    Euripides
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Paul Woodruff

    Bacchae (Woodruff Edition)

    "[Woodruff’s translation] is clear, fluent, and vigorous, well thought out, readable and forceful. The rhythms are right, ever-present but not too insistent or obvious. It can be spoken instead of read and so is viable as an acting version; and it keeps the lines of the plot well focused. The Introduction offers a good survey of critical approaches. The notes at the foot of the page are suitably brief and nonintrusive and give basic information for the non-specialist."
         —Charles Segal, Harvard University

  9. Consolation of Philosophy

    Boethius
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Joel C. Relihan

    Consolation of Philosophy

    "Entirely faithful to Boethius' Latin; Relihan's translation makes the philosophy of the Consolation intelligible to readers; it gives equal weight to the poetry—in fact, Relihan's metrical translation of Boethius' metra are themselves contributions of the first moment to Boethian studies. Boethius finally has a translator equal to his prodigious talents and his manifold vision."
         —Joseph Pucci, Brown University

  10. Electra, Phoenician Women, Bacchae, & Iphigenia at Aulis

    Euripides
    Translated, with Notes, by Cecelia Eaton Luschnig and Paul Woodruff, Introduction by Cecelia Eaton Luschnig

    Electra, Phoenician Women, Bacchae, & Iphigenia at Aulis

    The four late plays of Euripides collected here, in beautifully crafted translations by Cecelia Eaton Luschnig and Paul Woodruff, offer a faithful and dynamic representation of the playwright’s mature vision.

  11. Five Comedies

    Plautus and Terence
    Translated by Deena Berg and Douglass Parker

    Five Comedies

    "This is a book worthy of high praise. . . . All versions are exceedingly witty and versatile, in verse that ripples from one’s lips, pulling all the punches of Plautus, the knockabout king of farce, and proving that the more polished Terence can be just as funny. Accuracy to the original has been thoroughly respected, but look at the humour in rendering Diphilius’ play called Synapothnescontes as Three’s a Shroud. . . . Students in schools and colleges will benefit from short introductions to each play, to Roman stage conventions, to different types of Greek and Roman comedy, and there is a note on staging, with a diagram illustrating a typical Roman stage and further diagrams of the basic set for each play. The translators have paid more attention to stage directions than is usually given in translations, because they aim to show how these plays worked. This is a book to be used and enjoyed.”
         —Raymond J. Clark, The Classical Outlook

  12. Five Dialogues (Second Edition)

    Plato
    Translated by G. M. A. Grube
    Revised by John M. Cooper

    Five Dialogues (Second Edition)

    The second edition of Five Dialogues presents G. M. A. Grube’s distinguished translations, as revised by John Cooper for Plato, Complete Works. A number of new or expanded footnotes are also included along with an updated bibliography.

  13. Four Tragedies

    Sophocles
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Peter Meineck and Paul Woodruff

    Four Tragedies

    Meineck and Woodruff's new annotated translations of Sophocles' Ajax, Women of Trachis, Electra, and Philoctetes combine the same standards of accuracy, concision, clarity, and powerful speech that have so often made their Theban Plays a source of epiphany in the classroom and of understanding in the theatre.  Woodruff's Introduction offers a brisk and stimulating discussion of central themes in Sophoclean drama, the life of the playwright, staging issues, and each of the four featured plays.

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    Virgil
    Translated, with Notes and Introduction, by Kristina Chew

    Georgics

    "Chew's translation is, both in aesthetic and scholarly terms, an excellent piece of work. I find her approach refreshing and true to the spirit of the Georgics; her adventurousness strikes me as just the thing to rescue the poem from the appearance of blandness that a more straightforward style of translationese would inevitably, but misleadingly, impose upon it. This Georgics does not read much like any previous version of it. Chew helps the English reader to get a sense of Virgil's avant-garde poetics, which is the main thing that almost all translators of the Georgics work to eliminate, if indeed they are even aware of it.
    First-rate."
         —Joseph Farrell, Professor of Classical Studies, University of Pennsylvania

  15. Greek Lyric

    Translated, with Introduction, by Andrew M. Miller

    Greek Lyric

    “Miller is one of the ablest experts in the language of Greek poetry, and he has a razor-sharp sense for the nuances of the wording. A lastingly important sourcebook; I strongly recommend it.”
         —Gregory Nagy, Harvard University

  16. Greek Particles (Second Edition)

    J. D. Denniston

    Greek Particles (Second Edition)

    “This comprehensive scholarly work will not be superseded for another century. It is both a monumental and a readable book.”
         —Classical Philology

    A reprint of the Oxford University Press edition of 1966. Co-published in the U.K. by Gerald Duckworth and Company, Ltd.

  17. Iliad

    Homer
    Translated by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction by Sheila Murnaghan

    Iliad

    "Gripping. . . . Lombardo's achievement is all the more striking when you consider the difficulties of his task. . . . [He] manages to be respectful of Homer's dire spirit while providing on nearly every page some wonderfully fresh refashioning of his Greek. The result is a vivid and disarmingly hardbitten reworking of a great classic."
         —Daniel Mendelsohn, The New York Times Book Review

  18. Medea

    Euripides
    Translated by Diane Arnson Svarlien
    Introduction and Notes by Robin Mitchell-Boyask

    Medea

    "This is the Medea we have been waiting for.  It offers clarity without banality, eloquence without pretension, meter without doggerel, accuracy without clumsiness.  No English Medea can ever be Euripides', but this is as close as anyone has come so far, and a good deal closer than I thought anyone would ever come.  Arnson-Svarlien has shown herself exceedingly skillful in making Euripides sound Euripidean."
         —David M. Schaps, Bryn Mawr Classical Review

  19. Metamorphoses

    Ovid
    Translated by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction by W. R. Johnson

    Metamorphoses

    "Stanley Lombardo successfully matches Ovid’s human drama, imaginative brio, and irresistible momentum; and Ralph Johnson’s superb Introduction to Ovid's 'narratological paradise' is a bonus to this new and vigorous translation that should not be missed. Together, Introduction and text bring out the delightful unpredictability of Ovid’s 'history of the world' down to his times."
         —Elaine Fantham, Giger Professor of Latin, Emerita, Princeton University

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    Homer
    Translated by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction by Sheila Murnaghan

    Odyssey

    "[Lombardo] has brought his laconic wit and love of the ribald. . . to his version of the Odyssey. His carefully honed syntax gives the narrative energy and a whirlwind pace. The lines, rhythmic and clipped, have the tautness and force of Odysseus' bow."
         —Chris Hedges, The New York Times Book Review

  21. On Great Writing (On The Sublime)

    Longinus
    Translated, with Introduction, by G. M. A. Grube

    On Great Writing (On The Sublime)

    Celebrated for its own clarity and sublime style, this classic work of literary theory draws on the writings of Demosthenes, Plato, Sappho, Thucydides, Euripides, and Aeschylus, among others, to examine and delineate the essentials of a noble style. The complete translation, from the Greek of A. O. Prickard’s Oxford text, features an introduction by Grube, establishing the historical and critical context of the work, and a biographical index.

  22. On the Nature of Things

    Lucretius
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Martin Ferguson Smith

    On the Nature of Things

    "Martin Ferguson Smith has for many years been one of the leading Lucretian scholars in the world. . . . We should expect from the beginning then that we are in the hands of a wise and learned guide as soon as we open his Lucretius, and this expectation is certainly borne out by the quality of this sensitive and thoughtful edition. . . . The Introduction . . . is excellent. Smith outlines in a highly accessible manner what little is known of Lucretius' life and times, the poem's position and status in the Epic and Didactic tradition, and the philosophy of Epicurus that Lucretius puts forward, but also manages to include some of the most up to date research, including recent scholarship on the Herculaneum papyri. . . . But of course, the translation is the most important part of the work . . . [and] it is streets ahead of the competition. . . . I can recommend this book unreservedly."
         —Gordon Campbell, Hermathena

  23. On the War for Greek Freedom

    Herodotus
    Translated by Samuel Shirley
    Edited, with Introduction and Annotation, by James Romm

    On the War for Greek Freedom

    Designed for students with little or no background in ancient Greek language, history, and culture, this new abridgment presents those selections that comprise Herodotus’ historical narrative. These are meticulously annotated, and supplemented with a chronology of the Archaic Age, Historical Epilogue, glossary of main characters and places, index of proper names, and maps.

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    Sappho
    Translated by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction by Pamela Gordon

    Poems and Fragments

    "I have long been an admirer of Stanley Lombardo's translations of Homer, and I was curious to see how he would adapt his fast-paced, lively style to Sappho. He has succeeded admirably. His translation of 73 poems of Sappho is clear, energetic, and close to the Greek. Pamela Gordon's Introduction gives a lucid and useful guide for the non-specialist to the last fifty years of scholarly debate on Sappho. This edition will be particularly useful for instructors of courses in translation seeking an introduction to Sappho for the Greekless student. It is also a pleasure to read."
         —Laurel Bowman, The Classical Bulletin

  25. Prometheus Bound

    Aeschylus
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Deborah Roberts

    Prometheus Bound

    “This is the best Prometheus Bound in English. Deborah Roberts’ translation is accurate, readable, and true to the original in idiom, imagery, and the combination of a high style with occasional colloquialism. The informative notes and perceptive Introduction will help readers to experience the play with heightened pleasure and understanding.”
         —Seth L. Schein, Professor of Comparative Literature, University of California, Davis

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    Horace
    Translated by John Svarlien
    Introduction and Notes by David Mankin

    Satires

    "This work will be a welcome addition to course reading lists, as it does justice to Horace's misleadingly simple verse. Svarlien’s rhythmic lines go down lightly and easily—as he renders Horace's phrase, he 'writes like people talk,' yet it is a talk that jars and provokes. Mankin's concise and highly readable notes will be as useful to scholars as to new readers of Horace: they are packed with cultural background, stylistic commentary, useful cross-references, and appealing suggestions on interpretation."
         —Catherine Keane, Department of Classics, Washington University in St. Louis

  27. Satyricon

    Petronius
    Translated, With Notes and Topical Commentaries, by Sarah Ruden

    Satyricon

    "[Ruden] has caught, better than any translator known to me, both the conversational patterns of Petronian dialogue and the camera-sharp specificity and color of the Satyricon's descriptive passages.... A quite extraordinary achievement against heavy odds."
         —Peter Green, The Los Angeles Times Book Review

  28. The Electra Plays

    Aeschylus, Euripides, Sophocles
    Translated, with Notes, by Peter Meineck, Cecelia Eaton Luschnig, & Paul Woodruff; Introduction by Justina Gregory

    The Electra Plays

    "Once again, Peter Meineck and Paul Woodruff team up (this time with Cecelia Eaton Luschnig) to produce a thoroughly engaging text with lively translations that prove to be of great value to the college classroom. . . . The clarity of the translations, the unburdensome thoroughness of the introduction, and the judicious selection of footnotes, however, combine to allow students both within and outside the pertinent disciplines to appreciate how The Electra Plays speak directly to the world."
         —Mitchell M. Harris, Augustana College

  29. The Essential Aeneid

    Virgil
    Translated and Abridged by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction by W. R. Johnson

    The Essential Aeneid

    Stanley Lombardo's deft abridgment of his 2005 translation of the Aeneid preserves the arc and weight of Virgil's epic by presenting major books in their entirety and abridged books in extended passages seamlessly fitted together with narrative bridges. W. R. Johnson's Introduction, a shortened version of his masterly Introduction to that translation, will be welcomed by both beginning and seasoned students of the Aeneid, and by students of Roman history, classical mythology, and Western civilization.

  30. The Essential Homer

    Homer
    Translated and Edited by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction by Sheila Murnaghan

    The Essential Homer

    "Not only does one get an excellent translation of both Homer's Iliad and Odyssey under one cover, but the selections included are infinitely better and longer than what one normally gets in anthologies of Greek literature. For courses in which entire texts cannot be used, this is by far the best choice available today."
         —Kostas Myrsiades, Westchester University

  31. The Essential Iliad

    Homer
    Translated and Abridged by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction by Sheila Murnaghan

    The Essential Iliad

    While preserving the basic narrative of the Iliad, this selection also highlights the epic's high poetic moments and essential mythological content, and will prove especially useful in surveys of world literature.

  32. The Essential Metamorphoses

    Ovid
    Translated and Edited by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction by W. R. Johnson

    The Essential Metamorphoses

    The Essential Metamorphoses, Stanley Lombardo’s abridgment of his translation of Ovid’s Metamorphoses, preserves the epic frame of the poem as a whole while offering the best-known tales in a rendering remarkable for its clarity, wit, and vigor.  While making no pretense of offering an experience comparable to that of reading the whole of Ovid’s self-styled history “from the world’s first origins down to my own time,” this practical and judicious selection of myths at the heart of Roman mythology and literature yet manages to relate many of the most fascinating episodes in that world-historical march toward the Age of Augustus—and is accompanied by an Introduction that deftly sets them in their cosmological, theological, and Augustan contexts.

  33. The Greek and Roman Critics

    G. M. A. Grube

    The Greek and Roman Critics

    “An indispensable guide for anyone who wishes to study that . . . section of Greek and Latin literature which we should consider literary criticism.”
        —A. H. Armstrong

  34. The Meters of Greek and Latin Poetry

    James W. Halporn, Martin Ostwald, Thomas G. Rosenmeyer

    The Meters of Greek and Latin Poetry

    This reliable text presents a clear and simple outline of Greek and Latin meters in order that the verse of the Greeks and Romans may be read as poetry.

  35. The Murder of Herodes

    Translated, with Introduction, by Kathleen Freeman

    The Murder of Herodes

    These remarkable documents of Greek social and cultural history include masterpieces of lively narrative and subtle argument prepared by such orators as Lysias, Antiphon, and Demosthenes. The fifteen cases presented represent the first recorded instances of the working of a democratic jury system under a definite code of law aimed at inexpensive and equal justice for all citizens. Issues examined include murder, assault, property damage, embezzlement, contested legacies, illegal marriage, slander, and civil rights. Also provided are comprehensive background chapters on the professions of law and rhetoric in ancient Athens and explanatory notes clarifying the course of each trial.

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    Euripides
    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Cecelia Eaton Luschnig

    The Orestes Plays

    Featuring Cecelia Eaton Luschnig's annotated verse translations of Euripides' Electra, Iphigenia among the Tauri, and Orestes, this volume offers an ideal avenue for exploring the playwright's innovative treatment of both traditional and non-traditional stories concerning a central, fascinating member of the famous House of Atreus.

  37. The Tale of Cupid and Psyche

    Apuleius
    Translated, with Introduction, by Joel C. Relihan

    The Tale of Cupid and Psyche

    "Joel Relihan's playful and exuberant translation of Apuleius' Golden Ass has already won admiration for its ability to give an English-reading audience some sense of what it's like to experience this often astonishing writer in the original Latin. By presenting The Tale of Cupid and Psyche with its narrative frame and by supplementing it with key passages from other writers, he here provides the reader with the materials needed for an informed and complex engagement with this text; his carefully nuanced 'Afterthoughts' enrich that process further. This volume will appeal to anyone with interests in myth, religion, and folklore, and will surely find its place in a wide range of courses."
         —James B. Rives, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

  38. The Trial and Death of Socrates (Third Edition)

    Plato
    Translated by G. M. A. Grube
    Revised by John M. Cooper

    The Trial and Death of Socrates (Third Edition)

    The third edition of The Trial and Death of Socrates presents G. M. A. Grube’s distinguished translations, as revised by John Cooper for Plato, Complete Works. A number of new or expanded footnotes are also included along with a Select Bibliography.

  39. The Trials of Socrates

    Plato, Aristophanes, Xenophon
    Edited by C. D. C. Reeve

    The Trials of Socrates

    Lampooned in 406 B.C.E. in a blistering Aristophanic satire, Socrates was tried in 399 B.C.E. on a charge of corrupting the youth, convicted by a jury of about five hundred of his peers, and condemned to death. Glimpsed today through the extant writings of his contemporaries and near-contemporaries, he remains for us as compelling, enigmatic, and elusive a figure as Jesus or Buddha. Although present-day (like ancient Greek) opinion on "the real Socrates" diverges widely, six classic texts that any informed judgment of him must take into account appear together, for the first time, in this volume. Those of Plato and Xenophon appear in new, previously unpublished translations that combine accuracy, accessibility, and readability; that of Aristophanes' Clouds offers these same qualities in an unbowdlerized translation that captures brilliantly the bite of Aristophanes' wit. An Introduction to each text and judicious footnotes provide crucial background information and important cross-references.

  40. The Verb 'Be' In Ancient Greek

    Charles H. Kahn

    The Verb 'Be' In Ancient Greek

    “It is great news that this book is available again. It deserves to be better known, both for its pioneering methods of linguistic analysis and for the results to which they lead. It transforms our understanding of the all-important Greek verb ‘to be.’”
         —Myles Burnyeat, All Souls College, University of Oxford

  41. Theban Plays

    Sophocles
    Translated by Paul Woodruff and Peter Meineck
    Introduction by Paul Woodruff

    Theban Plays

    This volume offers the fruits of Peter Meineck and Paul Woodruff's dynamic collaboration on the plays of Sophocles' Theban cycle, presenting the translators' Oedipus Tyrannus (2000) along with Woodruff's Antigone (2001) and a muscular new Oedipus at Colonus by Meineck. Grippingly readable, all three translations combine fidelity to the Greek with concision, clarity, and powerful, hard-edged speech. Each play features foot-of-the-page notes, stage directions, and line numbers to the Greek. Woodruff's Introduction discusses the playwright, Athenian theatre and performance, the composition of the plays, and the plots and characters of each; it also offers thoughtful reflections on major critical interpretations of these plays.

  42. Three Comedies

    Aristophanes and Menander
    Translated by Douglass Parker
    Edited, with Introductions and Notes, by Timothy J. Moore

    Three Comedies

    "No one, but no one, ever translated ancient comedy like Douglass Parker, and his death left a chasm in the landscape. This posthumous publication of three of Greek theatre's wildest plays, edited and presented by a scholar as eminent and learned as Timothy Moore, is not just something to welcome, it is something to celebrate."
         —William Levitan, Grand Valley State University

  43. Two Novels from Ancient Greece

    Translated, with Introduction and Notes, by Stephen M. Trzaskoma

    Two Novels from Ancient Greece

    "Since [Chariton's Callirhoe and Xenophon of Ephesos' An Ephesian Story] first found their way into the mainstream of Classics instruction twenty years ago, the need for new translations has become obvious, not only because of the textual and theoretical advances made in the interim, but because of demand for examining them in broader contexts. For both surveys of Greek and Roman literature and courses on the history of prose fiction, that demand has now been elegantly met. Trzaskoma's translation, based on greatly improved Greek texts, shows a sophisticated appreciation of the range in vocabulary and tone within Chariton, and similarities and differences in style between Chariton and Xenophon become easily apparent. . . . The Chariton and Xenophon I thought I knew have become much richer and more compelling texts. Any student of the ancient novel, and any teacher wanting to create more students of the ancient novel, needs to read this book."
         —Joel C. Relihan, Professor of Classics, Wheaton College (Norton, Mass.)

  44. Works and Days & Theogony (Lombardo Edition)

    Hesiod
    Translated by Stanley Lombardo
    Introduction and Notes by Robert Lamberton

    Works and Days & Theogony (Lombardo Edition)

    “This is by far the best rendering of Hesiod’s poems in print. The translation is fully accurate but so readable one doesn’t want to stop; it exactly captures Hesiod’s rustic wisdom, his humour and his cautious pessimism. . . . Clear brief notes and a glossary make this a must for introductory courses: students will love it.”
         —Richard Janko, University College, London

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